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What is the typical mileage for your Prius?

  • Average about 35 mpg, as claimed by the CBS article.

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  • Average about 40 mpg.

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  • Average about 45 mpg.

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  • Average about 55 mpg.

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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
hyperion said:
"WATCH OUT!!!, ....... .... There's a cat crossing the road directly in front of you!!
You're right -getting too involved in what the MFD is doing can be dangerous. A person has to keep their eyes on the road. All the fuel savings you can imagine won't help when you've hurt someone through this kind of carelessness.
 

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Re: MPG/glide

rebal6 said:
What is glide. We just bought our Prius and are experimenting with driving styles. For instance---If I see a stop light coming up, I take my foot off the excelerator and coast a much longer distance than I used to..to a stop. it seems in this case, the blue arrows always come on. Only when I am at a standstill do no arrows come on. :D
In addition to using induced "glide" I have also noticed on occasion that my Prius will automatically go into "glide" while in cruise control mode. This happens on very slight downhill freeways with the cruise set in the neighborhood of 57 to 60mph. It doesn't last very long, but it is kind of interesting to see it happen anyway.
You are wise to experiment to see what driving habits affect your mileage. I try to make smooth starts and stops, and to anticipate traffic conditions and signal lights. My lifetime average is 54mpg since Oct. '04, with almost 60,000 miles on my '04 Prius. Good luck to you, and enjoy your Prius.
 

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mpg

Canadian Prius said:
hyperion said:
"WATCH OUT!!!, ....... .... There's a cat crossing the road directly in front of you!!
You're right -getting too involved in what the MFD is doing can be dangerous. A person has to keep their eyes on the road. All the fuel savings you can imagine won't help when you've hurt someone through this kind of carelessness.
C'mon, fellas, lighten up a bit! Don't you remember when you first got your Prius? I'll bet you were checking the display, too. For a good driver, scanning the rearview mirrors and instruments is part of the routine, and shouldn't be a problem. There are a lot of distracting things drivers do that are dangerous if one is not also watching the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Re: mpg

Roger V said:
[quote="Canadian Prius":1jb2es0k]
hyperion said:
"WATCH OUT!!!, ....... .... There's a cat crossing the road directly in front of you!!
You're right -getting too involved in what the MFD is doing can be dangerous. A person has to keep their eyes on the road. All the fuel savings you can imagine won't help when you've hurt someone through this kind of carelessness.
C'mon, fellas, lighten up a bit! Don't you remember when you first got your Prius? I'll bet you were checking the display, too. For a good driver, scanning the rearview mirrors and instruments is part of the routine, and shouldn't be a problem. There are a lot of distracting things drivers do that are dangerous if one is not also watching the road.[/quote:1jb2es0k]Well, ok... I guess a little fun will be all right... it's hard being politically correct and having fun at the same time... so I guess I'll have to give up one of them...
 

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Sorry, I can't agree. I've found after two years and a set of instruments that the MFD is really a toy and aside from fuel consumption relatively of little use except as a distraction.
I do agree that the prius is probably the biggest toy built for the masses and that we will accept much less comfort in seats, radio sytems, handling ect; account of the intriguing and completely different mode of power.
Gas milage is not something to sneeze about but after the newness wears off I have to ask myself if the milage is completely "worth it."
From all the posts it is very obvious that an awfull lot of attention is devoted to the MFD screen so I am very happy that the car is completely equipped with air bags.
I will endeaver to keep well clear of any Prius I see on the road and with drivers obviously using cell-phones, drinking coffee, reading the paper, or lighting a cigarette. As light as it is even the Prius weighs one ton, even on the roads in California.
 

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35mpg

OK, Hyperion, but what about your Scan Guage, which, under technical discussions here you indicated you "wouldn't drive without?" Aren't you looking at that as you drive? You say it shows you how little the MFD actually tells you.
 

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Scan Guage is between my eyes and the speedometer. I don't know how long you have been driving or flying or whatever but a slight glance at normal vehicle instruments is enough to let you know what is going on in any car. There is an occasional reason to glance at these but absolutely no reason to watch what is being depicted on the MFD.
Toyota does not want you to change anything about your driving habits from observing anything on the MFD. It's all taken care of by the computers for each system in the car, and if one fails you will get an idiot light indication easily spotted if you are not concentrating on the MFD.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Since posting this poll, I've checked other posts from Prius owners that keep detailed records of their mileage, and the results of the polls show a good parallel to those results.

In my case, I live at the top of a high hill, and my mileage suffers because of it. When I go on a long drive my mileage improves a lot compared to my usual relatively short drives, always ending with the climb up the hill.

But I have noticed that there is a concensus here that the Prius is more sensitive to adverse mileage conditions than other vehicles. Why would this be the case? All vehicles have the same EPA standards to determine their supposed mileage. We all know those standards are optimistic, but they are equally optimistic for all vehicles, not just the Prius. So, when the Prius gets poor mileage in a winter deep freeze, and maybe gets 35 mpg for a few miles, why wouldn't the SUV, with an EPA rating of 18 mpg also suffer, maybe getting 10 mpg on the same drive?

I think Prius detractors always take the worst case scenario for the Prius, and then compare it to the EPA rating for other cars, which don't happen to have MFDs to allow them to see the real results under various conditions.
 

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It might be helpful to read the Oct 2005 Consumer's Reports quoted, rather than rely on 3rd party interpretation.

On page 20, it lists the 10 vehicles that miss their EPA ratings, in city driving, by the largest per cent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
An04Prius said:
It might be helpful to read the Oct 2005 Consumer's Reports quoted, rather than rely on 3rd party "interpretation".
I have a lot of respect for Consumer Reports. I'm sure their reading of 44 mpg has a lot of credibility in a 'standard' testing environment. That is a pretty impressive result for any mid-size vehicle over the past fifty years.

The poll here is taken from people who own their Prius personally - a personal economic decision to be lived with for several years if not more. It is a group of people who have the interest in their choice to follow other people's experiences in this online forum.

Therefore, this is a special group, a group that not only can give us carefully considered information about the Prius, but also that uses it with interest and respect. I think information gleaned in this context is especially useful and relevant.
 

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The Prius (or most hybrids for that matter) are more sensitive to fuel robbing conditions because other cars are already exibiting the fuel robbing conditions normally.

For example: sitting at a traffic light. Normal car would be idling pretty much the same way no matter how cold or warm it is.
A prius when properly warmed up and not requiring exessive heat for the cabin or needing to charge the battery due to loads (such as AC), will burn exactly 0 fuel. However, if the drive system is too cold, or the cabin too cold, or the AC run too long at idle where the battery needs charging, you are back to conventional car conditions: using fuel at idle.

Short trips require richer mixture to warm things up. Still, the poorest mixture on a prius is the best mileage you'll get on a conventional car, about 35MPG.

EPA tests under the best conditions, rather than the average ones. Still, what is average? My average conditions are usually far better than many, as I travel long distances daily at moderate speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
DanMan32 said:
The Prius (or most hybrids for that matter) are more sensitive to fuel robbing conditions because other cars are already exibiting the fuel robbing conditions normally.
You make good points about this, and I think you are mostly right. However don't you think that with the EPA testing of an SUV under the best conditions would show a greater variance if compared to, say, its summer real world average or its below freezing winter real world average? I think all vehicles burn a lot more fuel in a cold winter.

I know that just stopping the engine on a Prius at stoplights does contribute very significatntly to the mileage it gets - on that score you are certainly right. This is why I think there should be a 'smart' air conditioning choice, i.e. you could select 100% user control, or, alternatively, a Prius computer control, such that the AC would turn itself off at 0 mph, or even if the engine would otherwise be stopped. Being a bit of a fanatic, I sometimes do this manually, and I don't notice any discomfort from not having heat (or cooling) for those minutes when I am stopped.

The length of trip makes a lot of difference to a Prius, and I agree it probably makes a lot less difference to other vehicles.

So overall, I have to agree that the best to worst conditions do make a lot more difference to a Prius than conventional vehicles. But it still bugs me that Prius detractors pick the very worst conditions, and drive it in the worst, most fuel consuming way they can, and then pretend that they did an 'average' test.
 

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Canadian Prius said:
An04Prius said:
It might be helpful to read the Oct 2005 Consumer's Reports quoted, rather than rely on 3rd party "interpretation".
I have a lot of respect for Consumer Reports. I'm sure their reading of 44 mpg has a lot of credibility in a 'standard' testing environment. That is a pretty impressive result for any mid-size vehicle over the past fifty years.

The poll here is taken from people who own their Prius personally - a personal economic decision to be lived with for several years if not more. It is a group of people who have the interest in their choice to follow other people's experiences in this online forum.

Therefore, this is a special group, a group that not only can give us carefully considered information about the Prius, but also that uses it with interest and respect. I think information gleaned in this context is especially useful and relevant.
I can agree. I think I frequently get more than the EPA for highway driving, simply by going the speed limit & driving modestly. I benefit from the mild/warm climate I usually drive in, & the fact I usually carry no passengers or significant cargo.
 

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Canadian Prius said:
This is why I think there should be a 'smart' air conditioning choice, i.e. you could select 100% user control, or, alternatively, a Prius computer control, such that the AC would turn itself off at 0 mph, or even if the engine would otherwise be stopped.
The AC compressor for 2004+ prius is electric, runs off the traction battery, therefore doesn't need ICE to run, until the battery gets low. I would agree though that it would be nice for the heat to turn off at stops so the ICE is not forced to run if the coolant isn't sufficiently hot for cabin heat.
 

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Canadian Prius said:
I know that just stopping the engine on a Prius at stoplights does contribute very significatntly to the mileage it gets - on that score you are certainly right. This is why I think there should be a 'smart' air conditioning choice, i.e. you could select 100% user control, or, alternatively, a Prius computer control, such that the AC would turn itself off at 0 mph, or even if the engine would otherwise be stopped. Being a bit of a fanatic, I sometimes do this manually, and I don't notice any discomfort from not having heat (or cooling) for those minutes when I am stopped.
Longest distance on one tankfull (almost the best 1-tank MPG) on my 2001 was one summer when my husband was driving my Prius to a client... One route to work, a different one coming home (seemed like downhill both ways!). When going at speed or up hill, he'd turn the fan on (AC button already set on). When coasting or stopped he'd turn the fan off, and if for long enough he'd also roll down the windows too... Pretty simple to have 100% manual control - just turn the fan to off! (make sure that you don't have the front windshield defroster selected, either.)

(note: Classic Prius has the AC compressor run via a belt on the engine, so to have AC use it runs the gasoline engine... 2004-? Prius is an electrically-driven AC compressor, but the engine may still come on to recharge the hybrid battery...)
 
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