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Would you buy an electric vehicle?


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Discussion Starter #1
Since thier are new electric vehicles coming to market now. And more affordable models are on the way. The cheapest at $45,000 is a 4 door pickup. That has a 100 mile driving range. With more affordable models in the works. This seems to be a question that needs to be answered. Because. How many buyers are out thier that would consider buying electric vehicle?

Note: Under $30,000 I consider affordable.
 

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I voted maybe.

It all depends on the exact type of vehicle. If the VentureOne EV turns out as advertised, then I would love to have one. It would make a great work vehicle. A Smart-sized EV with a 30 mile range would work great for my wife as a commuter, too. They would also have to be reasonably priced.

My main requirements for a work vehicle for myself: 2 place, with one able to hold a child seat (this is one that ruled out a Honda Insight,) 100 mile range, costs under $20,000 for a 2 seater, $30,000 for a 4 seater.

For my wife as a commuter: 2 place, with one able to hold a child seat, 30 mile range, cost under $15,000. (We looked at a used third-party conversion Ford Escort EV a couple years ago, but it just wasn't quite right.)

I would not buy a $40,000 full size car, though. Nor would I buy a single-place car. I drop my daughter off at daycare, my wife picks her up, so we both need to have child seats.
 

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Yes, and I hope to in the next couple years. I would love a safe, two-seater to commute to work. It doesn't have to be pretty or powerful.
 

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I voted "maybe" because it matters what the car can do and what it costs. After all, there are electric cars out now, so anyone who doesn't own one probably can't really vote "yes" without conditions.

Clearly if there was something with a feature set similar to the Prius but all-electric, I'd go for it. Even if it cost a bit more, but still what I could afford. Or even if it had less pickup, or a shorter range (though I'm a bit limited there: we're a one-car family so I'd hate to have no option for taking road trips for our occasional vacations other than rentals). Even if it was missing some of the convenience features like SKS (but boy, would I miss that). But take away too many things or add too much cost, and there'd be a tipping point where it was no longer the best choice.
 

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I would buy an electric vehicle ( I voted yes), that has a 100 mile range @ 70mph and costs around 25k for a 4 seater. This car would have to have a climate control system that works well in the north east and range not effected by cold weather. It would also need to have the ability to charge fast (say 5 minutes at a charging station) for when I make the trip to the next city over which is about 65 miles away. It can have a slow charger for home charging.

Alternatively I would buy a low speed electric vehicle that goes at least 40mph and has a range of 25 miles. I would pay 10k for that. Even the low speed vehicle would need a working climate control system.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What would I consider practical for electric car.

Two types of cars should be produced.
:arrow: Two seater subcompact hatchback with a 80 mile driving range. With the option of a extended 160 mile plus driving range. Price under $18,000. The extended range version would be an additional $4000. The concept of this vehicle would be to make it quite affordable. Unfortunatly sales volume for this vehicle could be similar to the Honda Insight. So creature comforts need to be improved in order to improve sales.

:arrow: The four door hatch back should be similar to the Prius in size. Driving range of the base model could be 70 miles. With options of extended range of over 140 miles. Price would start at $22,000. With the range extending battery pack costing additional $4000.

:idea: To keep cost down the same battery would be used in both vehicles. For the range extened version would have two batteries. The second battery could be dealer install at a later date.

All version of the vehicles would be be able to do at least 70 MPH.

:idea: Yes a driving range of over 250 miles would be nice. But may not be practical, because of increased cost, and weight. This needs to be consided against cost, and how often this increased range will be used.

Yes their are rapid charge battery packs that take less than 10 minutes to charge. These batteries are just now going into limited mass production this year. Note: The rapid 10 minute charger could not be installed in a home. This is because the 200 amp residential electrical service could not supply the required power level needed. What the rapid charger uses is 480 volt three phase power. Wich is more common in comercial applications.

Running the heater will reduce the driving distance of an electric car.
But using a heatpump instead of resitance heater will cut the energy use by about 60 percent or more. On a regular ICE car waist a lot of energy in the form of heat. This waist energy is used by the heater.
 

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what about that site LIONEV.com? they have some EV's for sale, they have an accent and tucson, also a ford ranger, I think the accent is like 29k, tucson is around 32 or so, and the ranger is about the same... I also saw an ad in the local flyer here that was advertising an electric car for 20k brand new and had a top speed of over 70 with a range of 100 mi. I have been looking into this for a while, my mom just bought a prius and I like the thing, and I am a power freak, but the oil companies are getting too much from us, something needs to be done. My friend just got an electric r/c car to go over 80mph, my radar gun wouldnt even clock it, so we need to find one of those cop things they put out to tell you how fast you are going, the technology is on it's way, the oil companies are crapping their pants, that's why gas is up so high, think about it, when did lithium batteries come out? around 95 or so napa had them? right around the year 2000 is when gas started going up.
 

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There should be a counterpart poll: Would you buy an electric car if gasoline were rationed?

My car driving began as the oil embargo began in the early 70s. As a result of this, I know the difference between gas prices rising and gas availability diminishing. During the embargo, gas became very hard to get. The price did NOT skyrocket to make supply and demand balance. Rationing and availability limits dominated. The price did go up, but not near enough to stop rationing or long lines. The availability problems were solved with the embargo collapsing.

Don't let the poll responses mislead. With low price ($3/gal), available gas, the electric car would be a modest market. With high price ($10/gal), available gas, the electric car would be a very big market. With rationed gas, the electric car would be part of every household.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The oil embargo of the 70s some facts
The OPEC contries stop shipping oil to the U.S. for retalation.
Oil supplies were in short supply. President Jimmy Carter instituted price controls. This didn't help the supply issue. But more likely hurt supply. Because more expensive sources could not be economically exploited. Oil companies were suppling gas to thier company owned outlets first. And only then selling the leftovers to the independit gas stations. This drove the some of the indendents out of buisness. And led to long lines at the gas stations due to the limited number company owned gas stations.
OPEC increased supply by the end of the 70s. Why did they do this?
They saw that the U.S. was now producing higher milage cars. This would eventualy result in a reduction in sales. The other reason was the the Saudes disliked the communist more than the captilist. Since the U.S. was trying to contain the exapansion of communist. So they turnned the pipe back on.
The situation that exist now is that developing coutries like China, and India are now experiancing huge manufacturing growth. This growth is fueled by oil. The Chines got most favored nation status from the U.S.. Bill Clinton signature is on the bottom of that sheet of paper. I wounder how many manufacturing jobs have gone to China. So when you type on your computer, watch your HD big screen TV, or listen to your Ipod. Just remember that it took oil to make that product. Then think were did that product come from. Then think of all those people working in those factories. That are they thinking about a shinny new car. That new car will need gas, that's made from oil. You have one sixths the world population sitting in China. And they will soon be all driving cars.
 

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There was an article in the Boston Globe lately that mentioned that Toyota was researching the mass interest in owning/using EV. I personally would not plug anything into the electric grid as that would raise my electric bill, and there is no way of telling if that raise would be less than, equal to or greater than my auto fuel consumption bill. If I could take advantage of a wind turbine to charge the car, I would consider that an option, but otherwise I will not be in the market for EV. Ever...
 

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I got into a Japanese car because of interest in hybrid power and the Japanese were the only manufacturers making them.
After over three years, I personally do no longer believe the hybrid is the way to go and so when an "American "EV" is available, that will be the way I will jump.
Right now I'm waiting patiently for the Chevy Volt."
I did a years "homework" before purchasing one of the first 04 Priuses and you can bet I am doing that now with the Chevy.
 

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I will buy this one to replace my ICE sport car. If price can be sustained for the masses.
People thinks EV are slow but check this out.

Has 350 Li-ion Batteries! 60kw per wheels x 8 wheelers @ 80hp per motor. Attached to each wheel.

Most of Japan's Auto manufacturers not interested to help develop it.


Eliica Project.
http://www.sfc.keio.ac.jp/visitors/igac ... 24.html.en
http://jp.youtube.com/watch?v=QS8jqmBh4M0


The first case study deals with the electric car project. Keiichi Tsutsumi of Electric Vehicle Laboratory talks about Eliica car, which has recorded a top speed of 370 kph.

Eliica -short for Electric Lithium-Ion battery Car- is an eco-car powered by lithium ion battery with high-level performance. Its outstanding features are increased mileage per charge and shortened recharging time. The Eliica Project aims to bring this environment -friendly car to the market. At the moment, two running prototypes have been developed and are undergoing tests to prove their safety and performance as passenger vehicles. Car No. 1 is meant for high-speed test driving and has recorded a top speed of 370 kph. while Car No. 2 has acquired car license to run on public roads. The project will continue further research and modification to make Eliica practically usable.
 

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Ok, now you've got me curious: why isn't a hybrid the way to go?

I'm open to all suggestions.
Two answers.
1) Existing hybrids are 100% gas powered. This started as a discussion of 100% electric powered cars.
2) A fully capable PHEV would be just as good as an EV, if the range is better than 10-20 miles on pure electric.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
leebek said:
I personally would not plug anything into the electric grid as that would raise my electric bill, and there is no way of telling if that raise would be less than, equal to or greater than my auto fuel consumption bill. If I could take advantage of a wind turbine to charge the car, I would consider that an option, but otherwise I will not be in the market for EV. Ever...
Energy cost for an electric vehicle is equiviant to 60 cents a gallon for gasoline. Another words if your car got 25 mpg, the same size electric car would only cost you 60 cents to drive the the same 25 miles. It would be like having a car that got over 100 mpg.
Even with half your electric power coming from coal plants. The electric car will polute less than a gas powered car.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
FL_Prius_Driver said:
adam1991 said:
Ok, now you've got me curious: why isn't a hybrid the way to go?

I'm open to all suggestions.
Two answers.
1) Existing hybrids are 100% gas powered. This started as a discussion of 100% electric powered cars.
2) A fully capable PHEV would be just as good as an EV, if the range is better than 10-20 miles on pure electric.
Hybrids try to get the most out of a gallon of gas. And they do help control increasing fuel cost. A Hybrid is good cost effective choice.
PHEV on the other hand should be hitting the roads in the next 2 to 3 years. It has the advantage of low opperating cost of a full electric. But for longer distance PHEV gets good gas milage like a hybrid. It only uses gas for trips over 20 or 30 miles. Has a smaller battery pack than a full electric. This helps reduce vehicle cost, and weight.
Electric Vehicle never needs gas. Energy prices of electic are stable and cheaper than gas. But the vehicle does have a limited driving range on a single charge. Driving range of electric vehicle is from about 40 to 240 miles. This is depended on the the type of vehicle and size of the battery. Easy charging at home.
 

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Depends where the electric comes from

I
live just outside Sacramento CA and the utility actually allowed the public to vote to take our perfectly good atomic plant offline. Nowadays we get electric from coal and jet engines that burn natural gas we even have a few diesel generators for summer time. so for me an electric would be a bad joke.. better for the environment for me to drive a diesel Hum-Vee with a slight oil leak. :roll:
 

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There you go! And it's because of those same voters that we have probably two last candidates for president (one from each party) that very few would really like to see in Washington. At least the folks are getting out to vote. Next job is to educate them!
(When my local nuclear plant shuts down for it's three weeks annual maintanence, my electric bill rises 11%) Hit them in the pocketbook and that might help.
 
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