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it was cold this AM and a new icon popped up, it looks like a snowflake -- it's next to the mph on the display. anybody know what that is?
 

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It is described in the owner's manual. It indicates that the outside temperature is 37 degrees or below and that you could have icing conditions on the road. It will go off when the temperature goes above 39 degrees.
 

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It's a reminder to bring the brass monkeys inside...
 

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lol

goes off at 4°C.. so what's that 39°F?
 

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39.2 degrees F. Are you sure it doesnt' turn off at 5 degrees C?
Maybe Canada uses the IMPERIAL Celsius scale: 5 regular Celsius = 4 Imperial Celsius like 5 regular quarts = 4 Imperial quarts. I used to get my best mpg in Canada until they switched to liters/litres. That could be a way to improve mpg in these United States: change from U.S. gallons to Imperial gallons!

Added: I just determined that the EPA mpg ratings are in all probability, based on Imperial Gallons as opposed to U.S. Gallons. When I recalculate my observed mpg using Imperial Gallons, the result is close to the EPA's published average combined city/highway. Therefore I'm now going to use Imperial Gallon measurement.
 

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Added: I just determined that the EPA mpg ratings are in all probability, based on Imperial Gallons as opposed to U.S. Gallons. When I recalculate my observed mpg using Imperial Gallons, the result is close to the EPA's published average combined city/highway. Therefore I'm now going to use Imperial Gallon measurement.
I really doubt that's true. EPA is a US entity, therefore would specify US measurements. In actuality, I wouldn't be suprised if SI units were used, and then converted.
 

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Added: I just determined that the EPA mpg ratings are in all probability, based on Imperial Gallons as opposed to U.S. Gallons. When I recalculate my observed mpg using Imperial Gallons, the result is close to the EPA's published average combined city/highway. Therefore I'm now going to use Imperial Gallon measurement.
I really doubt that's true. EPA is a US entity, therefore would specify US measurements. In actuality, I wouldn't be suprised if SI units were used, and then converted.
Remember, this is the same government that used different units of measurement in a multi-million dollar Mars explorer, resulting in the destruction of said vehicle.

How else do you account for the 20% disparity between the EPA mpg and real world mpg? ;) When I convert the fuel quantity used from US to Imperial, then my mpg matches the EPA. So, the EASIEST way to INCREASE your average mpg, is to calculate it using imp. gal.
 

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romad said:
How else do you account for the 20% disparity between the EPA mpg and real world mpg? ;)
Differences (unrelistic) in driving/testing style. For one, HVAC is not used at all in the tests, and tests are done in ideal ambient temps.
For 2, the test drive is under the best conditions you could ask for. Highway driving at 45MPH? PUL-EASE!
 
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