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To everyone who responded to my thread about, trading a Ford F-150 for the prius.

I did it got a salsa red, no extra packages other than the plan b security pack. (900 dollar cargo net) :evil:

Experience so far. Drove it on a 400 mile trip, some moderate hilly terrain. Averaged 43 MPG. Like the car so far. About the same amount of interior room as the F-150.

Scratching head as to how you can get better mileage in the city. I assume it involves cruising on the battery, and keeping the ICE from kicking in.
 

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Smart move

Congratulations, :D I believe you made a really good and smart move.
I traded in a mini van about 3 weeks ago for my Prius. Something tells me, the gas guzzlers (to me that is anything less than 25 MPG) will depreciate proportianately to the increase in gas prices. And the inverse will be true for the high mileage cars ie Prius.

I am getting low 40s in town too on very short trips. On the highway with cruise control, it jumps to low 50s. I will go through the engine break in period of a few thousand miles before making judgements about my mileage but whatever it works out to be, low 40s is one hell of a lot better than low 20s. In your case, 20 mpg with an F150 was probably a good day.
Greg
 

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I too traded my mini van a year and a half ago. I started missing it about six months ago but the mobil credit card bills enforced the feelings about my decision. Now however when we neighbors or families go out to dinner together or to the beach we have to take multiple cars, so there goes the savings and it's not half as much fun.
I guess we just get spoiled living in this country and I find myself slowing down now every time I drive past my Chrysler dealer and observe those Town and Country's parked out front. How much is "quaility of life" worth?
The Boston Globe had quite a sunday supplement devoted to Hybrid cars which are available now and in the near future. The gist of the article was the price difference between the standard car vs the hybrid deriveament. (Escape, Highlander, Accord, and Lexas SUV) The consensus was that to go hybrid added five thousand dollars to that of the converted car except for the Lexas which cost difference jumped by sixteen thousand. Also concluded that even if fuel prices increased to three dollars a gallon no one would ever break even on the fuel dollar savings on the usual span of normal car ownership.
From this I expect to see very few Hybrids manufactured by any one for the next few years.
 

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prion said:
To everyone who responded to my thread about, trading a Ford F-150 for the prius.

I did it got a salsa red, no extra packages other than the plan b security pack. (900 dollar cargo net) :evil:

Experience so far. Drove it on a 400 mile trip, some moderate hilly terrain. Averaged 43 MPG. Like the car so far. About the same amount of interior room as the F-150.

Scratching head as to how you can get better mileage in the city. I assume it involves cruising on the battery, and keeping the ICE from kicking in.


Not sure what a plan B security pack is. What Toyota region are you in? Each region seems to like renaming the Prius options, and the accessory groupings that they like adding on...
Toyota option packages: http://www.toyota.com/vehicles/2005/prius/options.html

As for "city" driving - what's your definition of "city?"
If you consider "city" driving to be short trips, then you'll see low MPG, in any car.
The EPA city test is much more of a rural backroads drive...

http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/info.shtml#estimates
How are fuel economy estimates obtained?
....
There are two different fuel economy estimates for each vehicle in the Fuel Economy Guide, one for city driving and one for highway driving. To generate these two estimates, separate tests are used to represent typical everyday driving in a city and in a rural setting. Two kinds of engine starts are used: the cold start, which is similar to starting a car in the morning after it has been parked all night; and the hot start, similar to restarting a vehicle after it has been warmed up, driven, and stopped for a short time.

The test used to determine the city fuel economy estimate simulates an 11-mile, stop-and-go trip with an average speed of 20 miles per hour (mph). The trip takes 31 minutes and has 23 stops. About 18 percent of the time is spent idling, as in waiting at traffic lights or in rush hour traffic. The maximum speed is 56 mph. The engine is initially started after being parked overnight. Vehicles are tested at 68 F to 86 F ambient temperature.
....
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Plan B Security is some worthless profit builder added by Gulf States Toyota. Includes, first aid kit, cargo net, floor mats, etc. Things that could have been bought afterwards, much cheaper, or not at all.
 

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F-150 for Prius

I also traded my F-150 in for a 2004 Prius. The Prius holds as much as my truck. I fly R/C airplanes. Everything that fitted in the truck fits in the Prius. I went from 15 MPG to 50 MPG. Best move I ever made. :)
Bob
 

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I guess you have to evaluate the % of time the Prius suits the need, to when it doesn't. If the % doesn't is very small, then rent the bigger vehicle when needed. If the % doesn't is very high, then the Prius may not be the best option.
 

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hyperion said:
The consensus was that to go hybrid added five thousand dollars to that of the converted car except for the Lexas which cost difference jumped by sixteen thousand. Also concluded that even if fuel prices increased to three dollars a gallon no one would ever break even on the fuel dollar savings on the usual span of normal car ownership.
From this I expect to see very few Hybrids manufactured by any one for the next few years.

I see this a lot in the media and in articles and even hear it from a lot of people that ask me how much difference in price it is to buy a Hybrid version of an already-existing model.

None of them ever take into consideration any of the other factors that would make one want to buy and drive a Hybrid. I know it's like preaching to the choir here but I hardly hear a mention of Emissions, Environmental benefits, reduction of oil dependency, etc etc...

I guess it goes to show that in the end consumers just look at the $ aspect. The "How much will it cost ME?" mentality.

I wonder if that will ever change.
 

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Price difference (hybrid/conventional)

The manufacturers have already had to calculate the price difference
between their alt-fueled vehicles and a conventional vehicle, for
certain state tax credits. Why not use the provided data, which will
hold up at tax time?

http://www.revenue.state.co.us/fyi/html/income09.html

Toyota Prius
2002 Toyota Prius:
Incremental price difference - $4,622
2003 Toyota Prius:
Incremental price difference - $3,612
2004 Toyota Prius:
Incremental price difference - $3,150
2005 Toyota Prius:
Incremental price difference - $4,040

Honda Insight
2002 Honda Insight:
Incremental price difference - $3,970
2003 Honda Insight (Automatic):
Incremental price difference - $3,670
2003 Honda Insight (Manual 5-speed):
Incremental price difference - $3,470
2004 Honda Insight (Automatic):
Incremental price difference - $5,070
2004 Honda Insight (Manual 5-speed):
Incremental price difference - $5,070
2005 Honda Insight (Automatic):
Incremental price difference - $5,545
2005 Honda Insight (Manual 5-speed):
Incremental price difference - $5,575

Honda Civic Hybrid
2003 Honda Civic Hybrid (Automatic):
Incremental price difference - $3,215
2003 Honda Civic Hybrid (Manual 5-speed):
Incremental price difference - $3,015
2004 Honda Civic Hybrid (Automatic):
Incremental price difference - $3,440
2004 Honda Civic Hybrid (Manual 5-speed)
Incremental price difference - $3,240
2005 Honda Civic Hybrid (Automatic):
Incremental price difference - $3,075
2005 Honda Civic Hybrid (Manual 5-speed)
Incremental price difference - $2,875

Honda Civic GX
2004 Honda Civic GX (Natural Gas):
Incremental price difference - $4,500
2005 Honda Civic GX (Natural Gas):
Incremental price difference - $4,500

Honda Accord Hybrid
2005 Honda Accord Hybrid:
Incremental price difference - $3,915

Ford Escape Hybrid
2005 Ford Escape (Front Wheel Drive):
Incremental price difference - $ 3,245
2005 Ford Escape (Four Wheel Drive):
Incremental price difference - $3,290

If I knew how to calculate for military spending (in both dollars and
in troops) to support the fuel system, or how to calculate for ULEV or
cleaner emissions compared to a conventional LEV auto, I would, but...
You also need to take into account differences in cost of maintenance,
insurance, depreciation (used Prius aren't depreciating much if at all
right now, often selling for new prices)...

There's also the VA solo HOV lanes, some areas have free hybrid parking or reduced tolls, and the federal income tax deduction (and some states have income tax deductions or credits, or reduced/no sales tax) that can also be factored in for the hybrids... Also, some states exempt some hybrids from the annual emissions inspections...
 
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