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First, I absolutely love my '04 Prius! I could not dream of a better car, except perhaps a General Motors EV-1, yet even then I'd have to compromise on range. My only complaint might be that the EV-er in me wants to see the engine shut off more often (like any time I lift my foot off the gas - at least within the 0-40 range where it lets you run all-electric). Oh, and that I *can't* plug it in to charge it, but it's still better than any other car commercially available at this time.

My only other concern, and the reason for this post, is that the Prius seems to have too much starting torque to work nicely with its traction system. Driving slowly up dirt and gravel roads or accelerating moderately heavily on dirt roads (and even once on pavement) causes the tires to spin a tad, so the traction system, rather than give me a second to get my grip and get moving, immediately kills all power to the wheels, then gives full power again about half a second later, which just causes it to skid again and shut down, until after several cycles of this I finally have the speed I need to maintain traction. Is anybody else experiencing this, or should I take it in to have my dealer look at it? I love the power, just not the traction control.

Thanks
-Ben
 

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Hi Ben,

I haven't experienced that. Though I admit my time on dirt roads has been very minimal. Perhaps it's just a matter to adjusting your "touch" on the accelerator. I know that I had some trouble with the brakes when I first got the Prius. They seemed really sensitive. But now the car has "trained" me. :wink:

David
 

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This spring I was at an intersection of a moderately busy street, waiting for a chance to get though. The snow had recently melted and there was sand on the street. I had a good feel by that time for the power of the car, so when I had an opening I floored it. And I barely moved! The sand caused the wheels to spin just a bit, and the TC shut down the power. I made it, because I'm a very conservative driver (unlike my politics!) and had waited for a big opening. But it was a bit frightening.

On the other hand, on ice the TC is great. I step on the gas, and the car applies just the right amount of power. Where other cars spin their wheels trying to get moving on the ice, my wheels never spin, and I get going faster than other cars. And stopping on ice with the ABS is great.

I'd like a way to disable the TC for situations when I know there's solid road below that light sprinkling of sand.
 

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It might be a little too fast. It isn't as easy to adjust this throttle as mush as it is on other cars, I would think. Other cars use a wire, this uses electricity. The dealer might be able to fine tune it very easily, or might be as hard as replacing an ECU.
 

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My only complaint might be that the EV-er in me wants to see the engine shut off more often (like any time I lift my foot off the gas - at least within the 0-40 range where it lets you run all-electric).
I thought about this as well and came to the conclusion that the on board computer is much better at weighing all of the data (historic and current) and deciding if it's best to switch off the IC entirely.
 
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Its the TIRES

The OEM tires SUCK. Sorry. I changed them after 400 miles and when accelerating on slippery surfaces, traction control intervention has diminished.
 

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Joel said:
I thought about this as well and came to the conclusion that the on board computer is much better at weighing all of the data (historic and current) and deciding if it's best to switch off the IC entirely.
Does the computer actually compile and use historical data? Does anyone know? This could be a bad idea when driving conditions change, as on a trip, or with the change of seasons, or when the car is sold, or there is more than one driver. My guess (unless anyone actually knows otherwise) would be that the program is static, with, possibly, a different routine during the break-in period.
 

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Of course they do - in just about every fuel injected vehicle you buy now days. The computer learns about the behaviors of the IC engine in order to fine tune emissions and economy. When making short term decisions about timing advance, fuel injection, and so on - the computer considers long term driving data as well as the usual short term factors like temperature, drive train load, speed, ect.

Daniel said:
Joel said:
I thought about this as well and came to the conclusion that the on board computer is much better at weighing all of the data (historic and current) and deciding if it's best to switch off the IC entirely.
Does the computer actually compile and use historical data? Does anyone know? This could be a bad idea when driving conditions change, as on a trip, or with the change of seasons, or when the car is sold, or there is more than one driver. My guess (unless anyone actually knows otherwise) would be that the program is static, with, possibly, a different routine during the break-in period.
 

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Could this "computer driving history" be the reason that Prius owners experience improved MPG after a month or so of driving? I know my MPG have steadily increased with every tank. I've gone from 45 to 48 in under a month
 
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