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Tires? I need new tires for my ‘05 Prius. The originals (Goodyear Integrity, M+S P185/165R15) were fine for both durability and mpg. I was thinking of just repeating these, but anyone with experiences with other tires would be appreciated. Many thanks in advance.
Edward
 

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When I had my 04, I replaced the Goodyear Integrity tires with the same thing as I had no problem with them. However, many drivers prefer something different, and for different reasons. I suggest you do a search for tires using the keyword "Integrity".
 

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I found the original tires on my '09 were not very good on ice and snow, so I got a set of Michelin Ice Xi2. They cost $107 each plus installation for about 5 bills total. Wow! What an improvement. Great on ice and snow. Some people say they suffer a drop in mpg with snow tires, but the Xi2 have a harder compound (which is why they cost more than regular Michelin Ice snows. I kept the original tires and will have them put on for spring and summer driving.
 

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You use the Goodyear Integrities in Madison Wis.???!! In the winter???!!

I'd recommend Nokian WR or WRG2. They give better mileage, work in snow and ice, and are also great on warm dry roads or in the rain. Handling also improves. I used the stock size.
A -true- "all season" tire.
 

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richard schumacher said:
Several people report better ride and/or handling using Nokias, Michelins, and others. No one that I've seen reports better MPGs, indeed most are not as good as the originals.
Richard,

My Nokian WRs are getting about 4% better MPG than the Goodyear Integrity tires when averaged over a 12 month interval. My previous Michelin MXV4+ tires managed to beat the GYs by about 1% with the improvement being in cold weather (The Integrity tires have good rolling resistance in warm weather).

JeffD
 

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Ah, we have a winner! Thanks Jeff.

May I ask what you paid for your WRs? What pressures do/did you use in the Integritys and in the WRs? Do your data indicate MPGs versus temperature? It's a rare day when it gets below freezing here.
 

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I had Goodyear Assurance Triple-Treads for most of the life of my 2005 Prius and loved them. I went with 195/60/15s since they don't make that tire in a 185. Very grippy and much, much better handling. Cost me about 1mpg, so no big deal. I much prefer a semi-performance or performance tire and I thought these were a good compromise. A number of companies are now making excellent performance tires which also have acceptable noise, ride, and economy.

This winter I moved to Goodyear Ultragrip GW3s (a top-rated performance snow tire - not an all-season). These have amazing winter performance but cost me 5mpg, which is pretty significant. Worth it though! In this case I went with 195/65/15s to squeeze just a tiny bit more ground-clearance for winter driving. (A 195/60/15 is just a bit shorter than the stock tires, while a 195/65/15 is just a bit taller).
 

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richard schumacher said:
Ah, we have a winner! Thanks Jeff.

May I ask what you paid for your WRs? What pressures do/did you use in the Integritys and in the WRs? Do your data indicate MPGs versus temperature? It's a rare day when it gets below freezing here.
Richard,

My WRs were less than $100 each about 18 months ago. I bought them via phone from:

http://www.tirefactory.net (careful, http://www.tirefactory.com is a different site)

But they seem to not be available in our size 185/65HR15 (I bought the H-rated ones as I like stronger tires) so consider the somewhat less aggressive WRg2s.

I run/ran all of my tires at 42/40 PSI even though the WRs can go higher (up to 51).

MPGs are a function of temperature (lower in cold weather), but tires with OrganoSilicates in the rubber compound reduce this effect and produce LRR as well as better traction in cold weather.

The attached Excel spreadsheet file details my experience in 139,500 miles of Prius enjoyment. Note that I do not use any particular techniques to enhance my MPG other than good maintenance so I average just under 46 miles/gallon (almost exactly what the EPA now estimates for our cars).

JeffD
 

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This doesn't relate to "tires" especially, but back to the ever going subject of "nitrogen" in the tires. (Which I've always felt was not necessary.)
Had my pickup in for a lube change this morning and mentioned I wanted the tires serviced with 35 pounds because I have been having to add 8 to 10 pounds monthly since December and nightly temperatures well below freezing. I have a set of "Mag" wheels on the truck and the lube center advised me that they were getting so many complaints about air loss with mag wheels that they've decided the loss occurs because of the fluctuation of temperatures from night to day noon. They are planning on installing "Nitrogen" tanks for winter tire service because of this problem. (interesting.) Seems that nitrogen does not leak as fast as the air with the change of temperature.
 

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Nitrogen?

Is this a matter of air expanding and contracting due to temperature variation greater than the expansion and contraction of the gas Nitrogen due to temperature variation?

If nitrogen is, indeed, a factor in improving mileage - reducing CO2 emissions, reducing dependence on foreign oil, looks like we'd be fools not to use it.

How hard is it to extract Nitrogen from the air - enough to fill tires?

Really, I meant how energy intensive is the extraction of nitrogen from the air? How does it effect the carbon footprint of a prius.

(What exactly IS the carbon footprint of a Prius?)

Steve
 

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Pure dry nitrogen is used in aircraft and race car tires, but it is completely insignificant in consumer tires. It is not worth driving any extra distance to get, and not worth paying anything extra for it. Recall that ordinary air is 79% nitrogen, and ordinary tire pumps already remove most of the water vapor from air.
 

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However, that is why I brought the subject back up. I had ridiculed the use of it in standard car tires and figured it's use as a marketing gimmic only. If I have to put eight more pounds of "air" in my "mag wheeled" pickup truck at the end of this month I'm taking it over to Discount Tires and having all four serviced with nitrogen for the rest of the winter.
 
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