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Discussion Starter #1
For those of you that have already replaced your tires once, about how long did they last? I've got nearly 30k on mine (acquired mine Jan 06) and the front two are looking bare already (they've been rotated at intervals). When I first got my Prius, I kept the tires inflated per Toyota's recommended PSI, but after doing some reading switched to the higher PSI that was touted on this site.
 

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I replaced the OEM Integritys on my '04 at 63K, and I have seen a few others post here about similar mileage. But there have been quite a few who report getting only in the 30K range. I have no magic bullet; inflation checked regularly and kept at about 37 psi, with rotation every 5K.
My '06 is approaching 23K with no visible unusual wear on the tires, and lots of tread left, so I'm hoping to get similar mileage out of this OEM set.
 

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OK, I read the article to which you refer, and under "recommendations" in the first sentence it says to me that regular rotations make for even wear and longer tread life, and suggests replacing all four tires at one time. At 63K I had worn three tires pretty much evenly, with the fourth having slightly more tread remaining because it was a replacement for one that suffered irrepairable punctures. At the time of replacement even the older three had useable treadlife, but it was a safety issue in wet weather and nearing time to sell the car.
I don't think that you can categorically state that for every driver replacing all four tires is wasting tire life. There are too many variables that enter into such a decision. And even the article you referenced says pretty much the same thing. What it mainly says to me is that if you are not replacing all four, you should replace in pairs, and that the new ones should go on the rear in a frontwheel drive car, to handle better in hydroplaning situations.
 

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Yes, that article's intent is a little different, but the point remains: if you keep the better tires on the rear, the rear tires will always have better-than-average tread. And it is always safer to have the better tread on the rear. Buying tires in pairs makes this easy. In terms of total time spent fiddling with tires and total expense the differences are small. There will be more occasions to buy tires but no rotations.
 

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By "no rotations" are you disregarding Toyota's maintenance schedule which calls for rotations at each 5K service? Seems to me that you would be buying more tires and paying for mounting, balancing, stems, disposal fees, etc., that they always seem to include when you buy new tires.
 

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Yes, I am disregarding Toyota's maintenance schedule for rotations. MMMBWWWAHAHAHAHA!!

I'm not following your objection. Buying tires two at a time does not result in additional work. (Obviously the two tires that get moved to the front don't get remounted, because you move the wheels.)
 

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If you aren't rotating all four, you are going to wear out the fronts much faster, so it would seem that you would be visiting the tire store more often, if only to buy two tires. If you are in fact following this method, how many miles do you get out of each tire, combined time on front and rear of the car?
 

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Indeed, I've never rotated the tires except twice, when buying tires. I first bought two new Integrities (the OEM tires) at 20,000 miles when the original two on the front had worn out. The new ones went on the back, and the two old (original) rear tires, which had less wear because they were on the rear, went to the front. I've just now repeated this at 29,000 miles. This means that one given pair of original tires lasted 20,000 miles in the rear and 9,000 miles in the front, or a total of 29,000 miles. Apparently these tires wear about twice as fast in the front as in the rear. If this is representative then I should need to buy two more tires every 14,500 miles or so, in other words next at around 43,500 miles. (Re-reading this thread I am reminded that the OP got the same life while rotating his tires regularly.)

Notice that this means that the tires wear out two at a time and get replaced, and at most only one of these still has some unused life left in it; if they both had life remaining then they would not be replaced. Someone who rotates tires regularly would ideally wear out all four of their tires before replacing them. But because the rotation schedule is probably not perfect, as many as three of those discarded tires will still have some life in them when they are replaced. And, on average, the rear tires on that car will be more worn than the rear tires on a car that uses the rotate-as-needed method. And that is less safe; by a small amount, probably, but I see no reason to deliberately make the car less safe when it can as-easily be made more safe.
 

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In re-reading the thread, did you notice my post stating that my OEM tires lasted 63K miles? I'm going to stick with the suggested 5K rotations. Even if there is marginal treadlife left in a tire as you describe, I'd rather not be pushing the edge of the envelope when it comes to safety. And if, as you say, the front tires are wearing twice as fast as the rears, at some point the tread on them is going to be getting low. In a highspeed accident avoidance manuever, such as a quick lane change, I would rather have some good grip left in those front tires.
But that is why they sell tires in any number that you want to buy, whether it be one, two or four. It is up to each owner to decide what works best in terms of safety, wear and the bank account.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
so i've come down to choosing between two tires, both from costco: the Michelin X-Radials vs the BF Goodrich Traction T/A. I want to have these on my car by next Thursday, when I take a trip. The Michelins are already in stock, whereas the BF Goodrichs would have to be ordered. Since the reviews and ratings are nearly identical, I'm going for the cheaper BF Goodrichs. I'm hoping to make it tomorrow so that I can go and order them at Costco. I live in Atlanta, so snow conditions aren't really a concern of mine. What I'm mainly wanting is a quiet, long-lasting tire that gets good mileage. Both seem to meet that criteria, so next I look at price, and the BF Goodrichs are ~$30 less.
 

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My original tires, Goodyear Integrity, are lasting only about 25,500 miles! I ran them at 40f, 38r, and rotated them every 5000 miles along with the oil change. I am disappointed.

I am seriously considering replacing the OEM tires with Michelin HydroEdge tires from Costco. I like the warranty, and I like shopping at Costco.

Comments?

Stan
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I researched the tires that Costco had, and the reason I chose BF Goodrich over Michelin was simply price. The BF Goodrich was $30 less/tire but they were only rated marginally less on tirerack.com, and if I remember correctly it had mainly to do with the snow/ice performance, which, for me, living in Atlanta, is not that big of a deal. My experience with Costco tire center was very good. The only complaint I have is the longish wait (2 hours), but that's just a sign they are busy and thus other people also find Costco to be a good place to get and install their tires.

As for the Hydroedges themselves, they got great reviews - the only consistent complaint was sometimes of noise (at high speeds and after a certain number of miles, say 20k) - probably a slight trade-off for the improved wet performance.

If you go ahead and get Michelin or BF Goodrich before 6/29, you can get the discount ($60 off a 4 Michelin, $10/tire off BF Goodrich).

Also, I ordered mine online and had them shipped to the store and had no troubles. In fact, it was very fast - I ordered Wednesday evening, they were shipped Thursday, and I got them installed on Friday - of course, I'm in Atlanta, so if you live further away from a large metropolitan area it might take longer (listed time is 5-10 business days),
 

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Thanks for your comments, Asian Brad. As you can see, I live in the SF Bay Area, and am not concerned with ice and snow. And I do stay away from the mountain areas in California in the winter.

I guess to get the discounts I need to act ASAP.

Thanks again.

Stan
 

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I have to add that if your Integrities show wear at 25,000 miles you have more of a problem than tires. Toyota recommends tire rotations at 5,000 miles on every car they build so the suspensions have something to do with the problem. It all can't be in the drivers lap when some folks easily get fifty and others are looking for solutions at twenty.
 

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The GY Integrity tires have soft sidewalls. That's why they scrub their edges on turns. Some things help:
  • Don't do aggressive turns!
    Use a higher air pressure (but stay below 44 PSI, their sidewall maximum rating). I ran mine at 42/40 and got 45k miles. My son-in-law got 55k miles on his, but he only drives in a straight line.
    Check your wheel alignment (only a slight toe in for stability)
The Integrity's get good MPG in the summer, but not in the winter compared to true LRR tires (e.g. Nokian WR, Michelin "Energy Saving" line). Wet and snow traction is poor, so I will never accept them on another car.

JeffD
 

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FYI - Michelin has been running a $40 to $60 rebate on a set of four tires almost continuously since we bought our Prius in 2002.

Just a comment...
 

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hyperion said:
"What the heck" They are French!
The only truly American tire company is Cooper (also known as Mastercraft). Their CS4 Touring tires (available as T, H and V rated) appear to have a reasonable rolling resistance due to the use of some silicon in the rubber compound. Some real data would be nice. The H-rated version is available in the 185/65HR15 size for the 2004+ Prius and could be a reasonable choice.

http://www.coopertire.com/

JeffD
 

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I had my original tires (purchased with my car) for about 55K miles. Then I purchased (as recommended here) a set of Michelin Hydroedge tires.

I keep them inflated at about 40 front, 38 back.

I have to say that my mileage has been disappointing. I'm getting only around 43 mpg when usually at this time of the year I'm getting closer to 50 or better.

Also, it just seems that ever since I put those tires on my car, the car moves a bit sluggishly, sort of like there's more friction involved when first accelerating.

Anyone have any ideas as to what might be wrong? At first I chalked the mileage up to "winter gas" when I purchased them but it's nearly July now and I haven't seen any increase in mileage.
 
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