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:lol: Thanks for the link, Richard....

REALLY *FUN* reading.
 

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I know I'M not anything like that...... :twisted:

Very very funny, thanks for the link. I sent a note to the author as well.
 

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hyperion said:
Funny thing but the car sales by the American automotive industry which are touting to be a resounding success have indicated that the car of choice regardless of fuel prices have been the SUV's.
You say "funny", I say "stupid". Potayto, potahto.

Enjoyed the story. Didn't recognize anyone in this group, though. :lol:
 

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Funny thing but the car sales by the American automotive industry which are touting to be a resounding success have indicated that the car of choice regardless of fuel prices have been the SUV's.
There's no doubt but that SUVs have been extremely popular with American drivers, and their higher profit margins have been popular with automakers.

However, this was during a time when gas was perceived as "cheap." Now gas is perceived as "expensive" and those SUVs are losing their appeal with a lot of people.

Overall, though, I don't see any basic change in the American public's love affair with power, power and more power and bigger and bigger cars. Environmentally, I don't think we're a very evolved society, as a whole.

Jan
 

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I think I am among the sinners. I own a Prius and a sport utility (Toyota Highlander). I bought the Prius as a hedge against rising gas prices as I drive a lot including 100 mi/day commute. Oh take pity on me for I am damned!
 

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That is AWESOME.

Here it is, for everyone to read...
The reckoning at hand for the Church of St. Prius
Steve Symanovich

Good morning, brothers and sisters, and welcome to the Church of St. Prius.
I'm pleased to see so many of you here today, including plenty of new faces. I trust you didn't have too much trouble finding a spot for your hybrid vehicles in the church parking lot.

As you know, the Church of St. Prius has undergone tremendous growth since its founding one year ago. Looking back, it's hard to believe that our congregation started out with just three members -- a Sierra Club signature gatherer, a solar-panel salesman and a granola distributor.

From the start, we prayed for other Americans to abandon their gas-guzzling ways and join us. And our prayers have been answered. Today, our ranks have swelled to include drivers from all walks of life.

While such success ought to be a cause for celebration, it is also a cause for concern. You see -- how to express this gingerly? -- I fear that our spoken desire to embrace inclusivity could overwhelm our unspoken desire to maintain exclusivity. In other words, we want to be special.

Brothers and sisters, let us not forget our roots. We built this church on three pillars: environmental sensitivity, spiritual rectitude and smug superiority.

As environmentalists, we knew we could do better than 8 miles per gallon. We knew that a trip to a McDonald's drive-up window didn't require a two-ton vehicle with four-wheel drive, seating for eight and bumpers at eye level.

As spiritual beings, we felt in our hearts that any mode of personal transport that takes up two lanes reflected an inner emptiness. We sensed in our fuel cells that you can't get to heaven in an SUV. Yes, and we were smug, and rightfully so. We rolled our eyes and played the air violin as we overheard SUV drivers recount woeful tales of $50 fill-ups at the pump. "Gas prices going up?" we sniffed. "Why, I hadn't noticed. I get 50 miles a gallon."

Did we make mistakes? Yes, we did. When we lobbied our legislators to open carpool lanes to hybrids carrying a lone driver -- one person, yes, but with virtue for three -- we were told to take a hike. "The nerve!" we said.

But, in the end, it wasn't hubris that hurt us the most; it was sky-high gas prices. Suddenly, it seems like just anybody can buy a hybrid, including those with questionable motivations. I'll spell it out: There are people, including former SUV drivers, who are buying hybrids such as the Prius not because it's the right thing to do, but because they want to save money. For all we know, they could be plowing that extra cash into jet skis, snowmobiles and condominium developments.

I've noticed that many hybrid drivers, once the Mother Teresas of the roadways, have adopted driving habits normally associated with BMW drivers. Just yesterday, I saw a hybrid run a red light. Later, I noticed a hybrid double-parked in front of Starbucks.

Brothers and sisters, I fear that dark days lie ahead. As members of the Church of St. Prius, we risk getting lumped in with everyday drivers who don't regard their choice of vehicle as a profound political statement and a badge of honor.

When you leave, I would encourage you to think about these troubling developments.

I thank you for coming, and please use your turn signals when exiting the parking lot.

STEVE SYMANOVICH is editor of the San Francisco Business Times. Reach him at [email protected].


© 2005 American City Business Journals Inc.
 

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hyperion said:
Funny thing but the car sales by the American automotive industry which are touting to be a resounding success have indicated that the car of choice regardless of fuel prices have been the SUV's.
Oh, you mean the sales figures that are a result of virtually giving away the cars at employee discounted prices? Such as selling the Chevy Compensator...I mean Avalanche at $9000 below original sticker?

If success is defined as lowering inventory out of necessity by giving away your biggest moneymakers for pennies on the dollar, then yes, I'll give you that the US auto industry have been a resounding success this year.
 
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