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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am shopping for a disabled scooter. Your approach to carrying it in Prius is interesting. I would like to know:

What brand/model, etc you have that you load into the P* that way?? I want to ck them out.

thanks
 

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My mother is out of town this weekend, so I'll have to wait a few days to get a response from her about her scooter... I know she was planning on taking the scooter with her on her trip.

The assisted mobility store that she went to (they sell scooters and also do car conversions), they were great. No pressure, no steering them to the high-end models or anything. They made sure that the make/model they suggest fits the person (size, usage characteristics, weight for handling, price, etc.). The place is in SE Mass., I can get you their info if you're local... They have a wide selection of models, and let the person take it out for a spin in their store and around the parking lot to get a feel for the handling and speed of the scooter.

To save on price, my mother got the floor model.

The scooter was really for my father, as he couldn't keep up with her after he had his heart attack. But, it was sized such that my mother could easily handle it, and that once my father passed, she could use it on occasion (when her arthritic knee acts up, like when a lot of walking is involved). The scooter breaks down into 4 parts: the chair, the rear motor, the front handles/wheel and floorboard, and the battery. After you've taken it apart and put it back together a few times, you can do it in under 5 minutes. I think the heaviest part is either the battery or the motor (I don't remember), around 32 pounds. Fits in the trunk of her 2002 Prius with room for groceries. It's the 3-wheeled version of the Pride GoGo scooter. http://www.pridemobility.com/products/G ... ultra.html
 

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Where I purchased my scooter.

My scooter is a small 4 wheel model. I looked in the local paper and bought it for $400.00. You also might check the internet. Google for scooters or disabilty scooters, used. Generall the one thing you might have to do is buy a battery. Sears is a good place for batteries.

Arizona Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks, both mrv & arizona, I appreciate the help. the Pride website was particularly helpful :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
DanMan32 said:
An04Prius said:
I am shopping for a disabled scooter.
Using it for parts? Otherwise, a disabled scooter wouldn't be too usefull. :)
got me, danman, good catch :wink:
 

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mrv said:
My mother is out of town this weekend, so I'll have to wait a few days to get a response from her about her scooter... I know she was planning on taking the scooter with her on her trip.
My mother is back from her trip from SE Mass to Montreal in Canada, using her 2002 Prius, and here's what she has to say:

Michelle, we took the scooter with us to Canada and used it a lot. It fit in the trunk with four person's baggages plus shopping and we also had four people in the car, went through mountains and had downpours of rain most of the week and we got lost in Montreal many times and we still only spent $57 on gas! My friends were amazed. This meant a trip to Montreal for four persons only cost $20 each! (They didn't let me chip in.) We did about 950 miles.

I have a Pride scooter, the name of the model is "Go-Go". Their web site is: http://www.pridemobility.com . It is a portable model which comes apart in four separate pieces, the heaviest piece weighing 29 lbs so that I can handle it myself. Of course, it is not quite as powerful as the bigger
models. The four pieces fit in the trunk of my (classic) 2002 Prius with room in the trunk to spare as we also fit into it four suitcases (medium size and strategically placed).

Mine is a 3 wheeler but it is available as a 4 wheeler. I think that my 3 wheeler might be a little easier to handle and manoeuvre especially when crowding into an elevator, sometimes when I'm lucky in the elevator, I can even turn it around and come out forward instead of backing up. It has a knob so that it can go faster or slower. The charge lasts probably two or three hours depending on your weight, the smoothness of the surface, or flatness of the surface. On a steeper incline (higher than about a 2" rise, like some handicapped wheelchair ramps), it has a release so that it can be rolled (or walked) up the incline.

To copy the actual "flyer" that came with it:
"The Go-Go" 3-Wheel Travel Vehicle takes easy transportability to a whole new level! It quickly and conveniently disasembles and the heaviest piece weighs only 29.5 lbs., so feel free to take it anywhere, even without a lift!

The Go-Go combines an ultra-compact size with impressive standard features: easy-to-remove battery pack, flat-free tires, an easily adjustable tiller, a 4-position seat, a maximum weight capacity of 250 lbs., and a top speed of 4 mph! The Go-Go is truly a must-have for those who are looking for easy transport and exceptional tight-space
maneuverability. Plus, with its super low price, the Go-Go delivers something even more impressive... tremenbous overall value."

It will fit in a closet when not in use. I used it when we visited Plymouth Rock, the mansion "The Breakers" in Newport, through the streets of Old Montreal, and throughout the Logan Airport terminals when waiting for our friends' arrivals. I brought the battery charger with me, found
plugs on the side walls of the terminals, plugged it in while waiting because I had forgotten to fully charge it before having left the house. It took a full charge in about an hour. Otherwise, I charged it after every time I used it. It has a guage on it telling you the status of the
battery as you use it.

I bought it in August of 2003, the price they wanted for it was $1085 then but I dickered and got it for $1025.

I would guess that it might use up about half of a classic Prius trunk.
It was originally purchased for my father, as after his heart attack he couldn't get around much (shuffled a lot), and couldn't really be left alone for a long period, so the scooter allowed him to keep up with my mother shopping and such. Once or twice my mother tried borrowing one of the larger 4-wheeled units that are available at some supermarkets or Walmart or such, and my father had trouble handling it, knocking into displays all the time, which he rarely did with the GoGo that my mother purchased.

Last year my mother did have to buy a new battery for the scooter. Although she did make sure to recharge it once a week, it went for many months unused or barely used, so the battery stopped accepting a charge nor allowed the scooter to start. Now she makes sure to "exercise" it daily (drive it around the house a bit) and she'll take it out with her shopping every so often.

I see that you already found and purchased your scooter, but maybe this will help someone in the future who finds the thread in an archive search...
 
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