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Well one thing I wanted to find out was it's ability to pull out fast when the engine is off. In general, the car was roomy, very quiet, with a very smooth ride. When the car was first started the ICE came on because the battery was low. After about 3 miles of driving the battery was fully charged and with the air off, when I cam to a stop light the engine shut down. When I tried to pull out fast, there was only a very short moment, about 1/2 sec where I was pulling out with the electric motor before the engine came on. The transition was smooth, and you had to focus on engine noise to notice the enginecame on. In general I felt the pull out ability was good. But I could think of pullout situations I would not want to be in. Like Pulling out onto the Pulaski Skyway in NJ near NYC, that's a stop sign pulling out onto a raised 2 lane highway with absolutel no sholder (cement walls). THough later in the week I did see a prius trying to do just that. I like the car, the dealer told me there was over a years wait for the car.
I like the car alot, but the price by far does not counter balance the gas savings. And I'm suspicious of the cost of long term repairs.

-Lee
 

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The electric motors in the prius develop more torque than that of many standard SUV's today. Most of your acelleration is supplied by the electric motor and is supplemented by the "ICE" The engine will always operate on start-ups until the catalytic converter is up to operating temp. Mine usually cranks up as I am backing out of garage and shuts down after about a block of driving. Your energy screen will not tell you when the "ICE" is running. Only when it is supplying power to charge battery or to supplement power. It can be running at stop lights in the winter just to keep up the emission temps. Only way to really tell is with after market engine running light indicator. The only engine supplying power in reverse is the electric but the "ICE" can be on for temp controll or to charge battery.
 

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See also http://www.priusonline.com/viewtopic.php?t=2361

Of course the lower MPG does not counter balance the savings in fuel (although it will be possible, depending on the car you would otherwise buy, how many miles you will drive, how long you will own the car etc etc). For me it was economically viable to buy this car, the choices I had were just as expensive as the Prius (I live in the Netherlands and car prices are a bit higher, but since the Prius is excempt from a certain tax it came within my 'reach' so to speak). Plus it's very comfortable for the 200 km I drive every day. Also the geek factor helped a lot of course and the fact that by driving this car I will save at least almost two tonnes of CO2 per year.
My alternative was a smaller Corolla with a diesel engine with manual gear box or a second hand Avensis with a diesel engine and automatic gear box.

And the Prius is quick enough to get along in any traffic, you just have to mash the pedal a bit. :D It's much much quicker than my previous car: it took my Peugeot 206 1.9 diesel almost 18 seconds to reach 60 MPH... :shock:
 

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As I (and others) have commented many times, when you say the gas savings will not pay for the difference, what are you comparing it to? If you compare the Prius to an econobox, no, the Prius will always cost more in the long run. But the Prius is also have a much nicer car. If you compare the Prius to a Lexus, the Prius is cheaper right off the mark, plus it costs less to run. And if you compare the Prius to a car with the same features and build quality, then the hybrid drivetrain is free, and it still costs less to run.

Long-term service prospects:

1. The Prius has no transmission to go bad. Mechanically, the PSD is like a differential. Much simpler and more reliable than a tranny.

2. The Prius has no clutch. There is nothing analogous to a clutch in it.

3. The brakes are only used in an emergency (when you slam on them) and under 8 mph, or when the battery is fully charged so that regen cannot function. Thus your brake pads will last much longer than the pads in another car.

4. Oil changes only every 5,000 miles, compared to 3,000 in many cars, and only necessary even then only to maintain the warranty. At 5,000 miles the oil is like new, because the engine has very little stress on it due to the unique starting method, and the fact that the HSD can keep the engine usually running very near its design rpm. When it's running at all, that is. Much of the time it's not even running.

5. Toyota quality.

As for acceleration, if you need the acceleration of a Corvette, maybe you don't want a Prius. But the Prius has faster acceleration than most cars on the road. Even if it burned the same amount of gas as other cars, the Prius would be the best car on the road at its price. Toyota is giving us the HSD for free.
 

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ltsnyder said:
But I could think of pullout situations I would not want to be in. Like Pulling out onto the Pulaski Skyway in NJ near NYC, that's a stop sign pulling out onto a raised 2 lane highway with absolutel no sholder (cement walls).
-Lee
Been there, done that.

I find my Prius has absolutely no problem on the GSP either, which I travel every morning on my way into work. Passing power isn't as good as my old VW, but it's certainly adequate.

Panic stops are a different story however.
 

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Jonnycat26 said:
Panic stops are a different story however.
What do you mean?

I had a panic stop this morning. In my old car ('92 Corola) I would have been swapping insurance information. Instead, I had about 3 feet to spare!
 

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CaPriusLover said:
What do you mean?

I had a panic stop this morning. In my old car ('92 Corola) I would have been swapping insurance information. Instead, I had about 3 feet to spare!
I had a panic stop on the parkway yesterday (NJ GSP) from about 70mph (which is the slow side of the average crusing speed). I mashed on the brakes, because traffic was screeching to a halt and an idiot in a Monte Carlo swerved into my lane right in front of me. The backend came a little "unglued" from the pavement. Kind of a little skid, nothing major, but something you can definitely feel, and it's not the first time I've felt it. The front wheels were firmly planted to the pavement tho.

I'd wager that the US/Can prius doesn't have the same stopping power of the EU/Jap prius due to the lack of rear disc brakes.
 

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I have had mine nearly a month now, and I don't know how I put up with the Honda CRV I had previously. The Prius starts, stops, and runs WAY better.
1. I commute about 10 miles to work along windy country roads that have been backing up due to detours and washouts a la Gaston. This car has great control and CAN SIT ON A 35 DEGREE INCLINE, FACING UPHILL, AND NOT ROLL BACKWARDS AT ALL while waiting for a break in traffic. It then accelerates beuatifully for the sometimes scary merges.

2. The power is great even with the AC on full blast. The CRV was noticeably sluggish with AC on.

3. Most amzing of all, I can't feel any difference in handling or acceleration with three passengers. The CRV felt loaded with just two.


I am averaging 45 mpg... which is OK. I am loving my commutes, which is wonderful. The car has a luxury feel to it the everybody comments on.
 
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