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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this on CNN

http://news.yahoo.com/s/pcworld/2005080 ... rld/122077

Apparently because of the simple password code used to attach to the Prius bluetooth system, it is relatively easy to hack into the bluetooth system to listen in on the conversations going on in the car.

Using a PC and a signal booster, you can hack into bluetooth systems in cars up to a mile away, all without the users knowing.

There is software freely available to try this is downloadable here: http://trifinite.org/trifinite_downloads.html

This version apparently notifies the riders of the car that their bluetooth system has been attached into by making an audio announcement. But it wont be long before you can get software that does not do this.

The only way to prevent this from happening is make sure either:

1. You never regester any phones to hook into your bluetooth connection
2. If you do have a phone registered, make sure it is always on and connected to the Prius. If not, outsiders can hack into the connection.

Have fun!
 

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Regardless of this development, anyone who imagines cell phone conversations are private is living in a cave.
 

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KTPhil said:
Regardless of this development, anyone who imagines cell phone conversations are private is living in a cave.
Yea, but this goes beyond cell phone conversations. The article says that conversations going on in the car can be overheard ... not cell phone conversations (as only one device can be "Bluetoothed" at a time). Better keep those lewd conversations on the DL.
 

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This really isn't that new or novel of an idea. However, its finally gaining in public exposure. I connected to a bluetooth device while on the highway by accident.

We were in downtown Seattle. I was using my pocket pc (with built-in bluetooth & wifi capabilities) to look for open APs. As we hit the highway, I tapped on the "turn wifi off" switch but hit the "turn bluetooth on" by mistake. The wifi light is green, but the bluetooth light is blue. As I sat there awed by the pretty blue flashing light, it found a network device I could connect to. I will not go into the details of being anything beyond that :wink: , but let's just say that if you don't change the factory default-so-easy-you'll-never-forget-it code, then don't be surprised if/when you fall victim to this hack.
 
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If someone want to hear my conversation while I am driving, they have way too much time on their hands and needs to get a life! Uh.. honey... I am running late... be home in 10. That's the extent of my phone use with b/t in the car.
 

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One could hear phone conversations by picking up sound vibrations off the door or window. Especially when talking to someone on the cell through bluetooth, the driver door speaker is used for the other caller's voice.
 

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Dang it! Now perfect strangers will hear me chanting my credit card numbers, discussing Osama's precise whereabouts, and narrating the litany of my currently active STD's.
 

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this isn't talking about hearing your phone conversations. its talking about hearing all of your in-car conversations, radio and any other sounds in your car.
 

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Did you know that GM's OnStar allows a third party to listen in on all in-car conversations also? (Even if you have not pressed the button).
 

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Wouldn't it be possible to make this "hack" a lot harder (or hard enough that under practical circumstances it is impossible) if you change the passcode from something easily guessable like the default code (what is it, something like 0000?) to maybe a random 8 digit number? I changed the one on mine to a multi-digit random number.
 

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KTPhil said:
Regardless of this development, anyone who imagines cell phone conversations are private is living in a cave.
Why? While GSM doesn't exactly have the best encryption scheme, it's decently difficult to crack and should deter all but the most determined easedroppers.

Now, of course, the call can be spied upon at the network level. But that requires a level of access that few have.

And, of course, if you're in a public place, people can hear you anyway. But that's not a limitation of the technology.
 

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KTPhil said:
Did you know that GM's OnStar allows a third party to listen in on all in-car conversations also? (Even if you have not pressed the button).
Yes, but that 3rd party is the govt or OnStar. It's not me or anyone else with a laptop and a bluetooth adapter. :)
 

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Hmm... not likely that this would be a problem with the Prius. The code is variable, not set at the manufacture - so the cracker would need to break the 4 digit code - not that tough if given extended access, but we're talking about driving around. Also, this is ineffective if your phone "shakes hands" with the car because only one client relationship is supported at a time. This security practitioner rates this risk as UNLIKELY for Prius Bluetooth users. Jabra users, different story.
 
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