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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm moving from a Ford Explorer to an '05 Prius and am looking forward to the new experience. One feature of the Explorer I'm going to miss is the little keypad on the driver's door. If, for any reason I can't get into the car (threw keys into car while on a jog, locked myself out :oops:, etc., etc.), all I have to do is punch in my numeric code and I'm in. Does anyone know if this is an after-market accessory that we could get installed in/on the Prius?
 

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Yes, I understand the smartkey system, but what If I'm outside the house (and my key fob thingey is inside the house somewhere) and I just want to get into the car to retrieve something (or put something in) without having to go back into the house. Get my drift?
 

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jumpshot said:
Get my drift?
I get it ... what did you do before you had the Explorer with a key pad?

I haven't seen anything about an aftermarket keypad for a Prius. I'm not sure one would work with the system.
 

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The keyless entry number pad is a distinctly Ford thing. I believe that Nissan played around with it on the Maxima during the late 80s early 90s, but don't ask me about specific model years. Ford developed the number pad in the early 80s because they wanted keyless entry, but the small transmitters we all have today had not been developed yet. It was just easier to put a 5 button pad on the exterior of the vehicle and have it interface with the power locks and trunk lid than it was to try to integrate a radio receiver into the computer system of the vehicle.

Anyway, Ford has kept the keypad around on many keyless entry models just because it is one of their selling points. I have found it convenient to use when I'm off with my parents and need to get back into their vehicle. I have memorized their code and use it every now and then. So, I understand why you will miss it with the Prius.

The Prius is my first vehicle with any kind of keyless entry. Smart key is really cool. First off, if you throw the fob in the vehicle and try to lock the car, the car will refuse to do so. It will just keep unlocking the doors. You would have to turn off SKS with the switch at the bottom of the driver’s knee panel for you to have that flexibility. However once the fob is locked in the car, you will have to have the small physical key with you to regain entry. I wouldn't recommend that unless you are very good at keeping keys around, or choose to have a spare key around for good measure.

I have done an experiment and if I remove the physical key from the fob and then leave the fob in the vehicle with smart key activated I can lock the vehicle with the physical key. It is like the vehicle understands that I do have a key and can get in even though the fob is still present in the vehicle.

I believe that the risk you run with the fob in the vehicle is the constant polling the vehicle does when it finds a smart key in receiver range. I'm not sure how much extra draw that would have on the 12v stand-by battery, but it is a concern. Can someone comment on that observation?
 

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I also went from an Explorer with the keypad to a Prius. It would be nice to have the keypad on the Prius. There are times (biking, skiing, swimming) when I'd like to leave/lock my fob in the car (guess I'd have to turn the SKS off, though).

Ford does sell the keypad as an aftermarket accessory. It sticks on, so protrudes out a bit further from the door than the integrated version.

I would think a reasonably competent sort could install it on a Prius, SKS notwithstanding. Maybe Ford service, maybe Toyota, maybe a quality stereo shop.

That sort would not be me, however!

rob
 

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I'm another Prius owner who traded in an Explorer with the keypad entry system. At first I thought I'd really miss it but I don't. The convenience of the SKS far outweighs the convenience of the keypad entry. And I don't even have to worry that I'll forget and lock my key in the car the way I had to worry when I traveled and rented a car. I'm extremely happy with the SKS and wouldn't bother to install a keypad entry were it available. Now if Toyota would just do something about that annoying back-up beeper... :lol:
 

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janets98 said:
Now if Toyota would just do something about that annoying back-up beeper... :lol:
The "back-up beeper" can be disabled. Search for the threads on this forum which describe the steps to disable it. I can't remember the sequence of buttons to push at the moment.
 

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janets98 said:
Now if Toyota would just do something about that annoying back-up beeper... :lol:
You can find the process to turn off the back up beeps and SO much more in John's user-guide. http://john1701a.com/

Read it and then pass it on to anyone who will be driving your car.
 

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Here are the instructions:

Some people find the reverse beeper distracting. Although there isn't a method to change the repetitive beeping to just a short warning, there is a way to disable it completely. To do that, carefully follow these steps:

1) Switch to the odometer/trip value to display “ODO” by pushing the “ODO TRIP” button shown in the lower-right corner of the photo below. If the speedometer-cluster was already showing “ODO”, make sure to cycle thru each option back to “ODO” again.
2) Power OFF (push the "Power" button).
3) Power ON (push the "Power" button again).
4) Within 6 seconds of powering back ON, push & hold the button for “ODO” for a minimum of 10 seconds.
5) While still holding the button for “ODO”, shift into "R" (Reverse), then to "P" (Park).
6) "b-on" should display on the odometer/trip-meter now. Push the “ODO TRIP” button to switch the mode to "b-oFF", as shown here:
7) Power OFF (push the "Power" button). That’s it! The beep should now be disabled.

Note #1: If the sequence above failed, it may have due to the “ODO” setting not having been visible recently. In that case, all you have to do is drive with it that way for a few miles. The next time you try to disable the beeper, the process should work.

Note #2: If you ever disconnect the 12-volt auxiliary battery from the system (or drain it dead), you may have to repeat the disable process again.
 

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Thanks. I'm definitely going to turn that thing off. So many aspects of this vehicle are so well thought out and engineered but... Dang! That beeper just leaves me wondering WHAT WERE THEY THINKING? :?
 
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