Toyota Prius Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know how to disable only when following the steps, but I remember most cars have a relay or fuse that you can pull to disable traction control.

Any ideas how to disable the traction control?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
I believe the traction control is there to protect the drive train (transmission, ICE, MG, etc.). If you disable the traction control, you will probably void your warranty also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Traction Control

Use at you own risk. Drive train damage could result. It takes a sensitive foot.
*****************
To DISABLE TRACTION CONTROL on the Prius:
1) Turn the car to ignition by pressing START twice without pressing the brake.
2) Floor the gas pedal two times (two full top to bottom pressings)
3) Make sure the Emergency brake is on now and put the car into NEUTRAL
4) Again press the gas pedal two times
5) Push PARK and press the gas pedal two more times
6) Now put your foot on the BRAKE and press START one time while holding the brake down.

The prius will reset traction control to normal the next time you start it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Will this trick work on a 2005?

I have a friend whose house is on the side of a hill. The driveway goes down to the house and is extremely steep. There are trees over the driveway. The leaves from the trees make the driveway very slippery. The last time I went over there I almost needed to call a tow truck to get out of the driveway.

Turning off the TC and a very slow and steady foot might do the trick next time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
What exactly do you mean by "permanently"? THis method only applies until you shut down.

Wyou bypass this way the throttle will open only to one of several preprogrammed degrees to force fixed RPM operation of the ICE:

- The idling speed in inspection mode is approximately 1,000 rpm.
- The engine speed increases to 1,500 rpm if the accelerator pedal is depressed by less than 60%.
- If the accelerator pedal is depressed by more than 60%, the engine speed increases to 2,500 rpm.

Not sure how the car performs with these "digital" ICE speeds. Maybe the PSD smooths it, maybe you drive very jerkily. I'm not inclined to be the test subject...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
887 Posts
D said:
I know how to disable only when following the steps, but I remember most cars have a relay or fuse that you can pull to disable traction control.

Any ideas how to disable the traction control?
Here is the deal. The TC on the Prius is not only there to provide control to the driver, but also to prevent over reving of the internal components of the hybrid drive train. MGs 1 and 2 both have top level RPM limits which while driving the vehicle will not voilate under any conditions. Wheel spin could put either of the MGs into an over rev situation, which could damage them.

In slick conditions people often let wheels spin, even though it is highly unadvised, in order to maintain momentum on a slippry surface. However a conventional vehicle can damage parts that way also, the difference is that the parts you damage can handle a few out of controll wheel spins a couple of times without doing any long term damage. But on the Prius, Toyota being conservative, wanted to make sure that their engineered upper RPM limits were observed at all times. In a wheel spin situation the vehicle can't control the RPMs of the MGs. So, the only way to control it is through clamping down on the out of control wheel.

The stock tires tend to break away pretty easily under less than ideal conditions, which then leads to TC kicking in and stopping the out of control wheel.

Defeating the TC just to climb a hill is not advisable considering the purpose for the protective TC activity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
jeromep said:
D said:
I know how to disable only when following the steps, but I remember most cars have a relay or fuse that you can pull to disable traction control.

Any ideas how to disable the traction control?
Here is the deal. The TC on the Prius is not only there to provide control to the driver, but also to prevent over reving of the internal components of the hybrid drive train. MGs 1 and 2 both have top level RPM limits which while driving the vehicle will not voilate under any conditions. Wheel spin could put either of the MGs into an over rev situation, which could damage them.

In slick conditions people often let wheels spin, even though it is highly unadvised, in order to maintain momentum on a slippry surface. However a conventional vehicle can damage parts that way also, the difference is that the parts you damage can handle a few out of controll wheel spins a couple of times without doing any long term damage. But on the Prius, Toyota being conservative, wanted to make sure that their engineered upper RPM limits were observed at all times. In a wheel spin situation the vehicle can't control the RPMs of the MGs. So, the only way to control it is through clamping down on the out of control wheel.

The stock tires tend to break away pretty easily under less than ideal conditions, which then leads to TC kicking in and stopping the out of control wheel.

Defeating the TC just to climb a hill is not advisable considering the purpose for the protective TC activity.
Bottom line is get new tires to deal with the conditions under which you drive! Do not disable the TC, unless you want to disable your Prius then go ahead. Let everyone how it turns out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,166 Posts
Interesting thing is, my car allows a bit of spin more than it used to. A few days ago, I actually squeaked the wheels a bit going from a dirt path to asphalt. Didn't see the TC indicator flash either. It seems I am getting more traction now, being near the end of the tire's life, than when it was new.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
DanMan32 said:
Interesting thing is, my car allows a bit of spin more than it used to. A few days ago, I actually squeaked the wheels a bit going from a dirt path to asphalt. Didn't see the TC indicator flash either. It seems I am getting more traction now, being near the end of the tire's life, than when it was new.
That's why I was so impressed. I thought the Prius was a glorified golf cart before my wife and I test drove it. She drove first. First thing she did was squeal the tires burning out from the dealership. I knew I was sold on the car right then. Of course, when I actually own the car I can't do any of that because it wastes gas and shortens the life of the tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Living in Michigan and having owned 2 Priuses I can honestly say they should NOT be sold in any state where it snows and/or the temp dips below 32F. My current vehicle is a 2016 Prius and last winter I got stuck at the takeout order station in a McDonalds! Obviously, the pavement was perfectly level with only a scrim of snow and ice. The guy behind me had to push me forward to where I could get traction and chuckled all the way back to his truck. The other time, and this has happened on numerous occasions during the winter months, I was idling while waiting to pull into traffic at a busy intersection-SAME THING ! The vehicle would not not budge so two drivers had to push me out while another acted like a traffic cop and created a break in the on-coming traffic. I'm looking at Subarus now.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top