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So everyone is saying how great and reliable the Prius is, but the majority of people who are going on about this are reporting their findings within one year or two years of ownership and with low odometer readings...

What sort of experiences have people here had who have really racked some miles on their Priusessss? Who has the highest mileage and what's gone wrong?

Anyone over 100K?

When does it "go south"?
 

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Check back in a few years and we should have an answer. Closest I can get you is a recent report of a true 1st generation (1997) Japanese Prius that had been exported to Australia at some point past 200k miles seemed to have a true 'worn out' battery.

Considering improved battery technology and improved battery protective programming we'll probably be looking at 250k miles plus.

One guy I know personally is beyond 100k miles on his '04 Prius with absolutely no measurable decline in battery function. His data is reliable in that he's knowledgeable enough to test his battery to determine internal resistances and capacity. Unfortunately it's also someone non-standard b/c he's used extra battery capacity he's added himself.

http://privatenrg.com/#100kBrakePads
 

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The highest that I know about is still Andrew Grant, the Vancouver taxi driver. Google and you'll see several articles about him. (He had a 2001 over 200,000 miles (322,000+ km), traded it for a 2003 with Toyota for testing, and he now uses a 2004 for his taxi service.)

There's been one post from someone on this site over 200,000miles, but that thread was lost in the database crash a while back.

There's some ongoing threads on toyota-prius yahoogroup of several members over 100,000 miles, which includes the group founder...
 

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117K miles, 5 years.
Out of pocket: replaced accelerator pedal at 80K, replaced front wheel bearings at 90K.

Hybrid system still going great. Mileage has been increasing over the last month from 41/42 to 44/45. Probably because they've been resurfacing the horribly potholed and torn up interstate I commute on.
 

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My 2001 has 116,500 miles on it. It's going strong. No rattles, tracks well, 44 average mpg. I purchased it "pre-owned" three weeks ago from a Toyota dealership.

All TSBs and required maintenance have been performed and required parts updated such as the throttle assembly, the battery sealing, etc.

My local Toyota service manager mentioned to me that they expect the ICE to fail before the hybrid system or the battery. And even then, it should be fine for at least 200,000 miles, minimum. A new crate engine can be slapped in for about $5,000 including labor, or a salvaged engine from a totaled car for under $2,000. With ordinary maintenance the car should run until the body starts to rust away and the plastic deteriorates, in about ten years.
 

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RSnyder said:
117K miles, 5 years.
Out of pocket: replaced accelerator pedal at 80K, replaced front wheel bearings at 90K.

Hybrid system still going great.
So you would argue AGAINST the extended warranty, then?
 

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Thomme said:
RSnyder said:
117K miles, 5 years.
Out of pocket: replaced accelerator pedal at 80K, replaced front wheel bearings at 90K.

Hybrid system still going great.
So you would argue AGAINST the extended warranty, then?
Absolutely not!

I really appreciate that the original owner paid for and took advantage of the extended warranty. Alot of the TSB, recall, and warranty service was accomplished by the previous owner and the Toyota Dealer under the 100,000-mile extended warranty. Some of the work was taken care of under the original factory warranty.

As a second owner purchasing a car with 115, 000 miles on it, there are virtually no extended warranty options available, especially from Toyota.
 

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Thomme said:
RSnyder said:
117K miles, 5 years.
Out of pocket: replaced accelerator pedal at 80K, replaced front wheel bearings at 90K.

Hybrid system still going great.
So you would argue AGAINST the extended warranty, then?
Not based on one data point, certainly.

Like any other extended warranty, you will on average make out better by not getting it, but if you happen to be unlucky, you could make out MUCH worse. Many people like the security of a known higher than average cost as opposed to an unknown cost that will probably be less but could be high enough that you can't afford it. If you lose your transportation due to bad luck, it could snowball disasterously (lose job, etc.). So unless you can cover the occasional big loss, I still think the extended warranty is prudent.
 

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RSnyder said:
Like any other extended warranty, you will on average make out better by not getting it, but if you happen to be unlucky, you could make out MUCH worse. Many people like the security of a known higher than average cost as opposed to an unknown cost that will probably be less but could be high enough that you can't afford it. If you lose your transportation due to bad luck, it could snowball disasterously (lose job, etc.). So unless you can cover the occasional big loss, I still think the extended warranty is prudent.
But if you own several cars over your lifetime, like most of us do, then you are better off never getting one. Now my Prius is still under Toyota warranty, but let's say it isn't and I have a failure of some part that will run me $1,500. Now my dealer offered the extended warranty for $750 and one for $1,100 (could have teh numbers wrong, I barely paid attention), but others have posted getting it for I think $500. So you say, jeez Spike, if you had bought the extended warranty for $500, you would have saved $1,000. A thousand bucks is not chump change certainly. And on the surface, that would seem to make sense. And many people would never buy a car without the extended warranty again. But you miss a crucial fact, the Prius is not my first new car and I skipped the extended warranty on all of them. So, if, and it is a big if, I could have gotten the extended warranty on all of them for $500 each, on 6 cars that is $3,000. On none of the others did I ever have a repair that would have been covered by any extended warranty I ever loooked at. So in this scenario, I saved $1,500 overall by not spending $3,000 on an extended warranties over the years. Never mind the fact that some of those were bought pre-internet, so I would have paid more for the extended warranty. But more importantly, most people finance that extended warranty so you have paid 3-7 years worth of interest on that money. Cha-Ching Cha-Ching. You would have been far better off taking that extra money every month and putting it a savings account, earning minimal interest. You would then have the money, plus some extra to cover the rare repair & transportation if you are far from home. But most of us, do most of our driving close to home, so that cost shouldn't be a big concern. And if you are going to lose your job over car trouble, than your life is in really tough shape.
The reason extended warrantties are so popular with dealers, is the HUGE $$ they make off them.
OK, for the early adaptors the Prius was an unknown to a certain extent. So I will understand the first people wanting that coverage, heck I bought in 04 and I actually thought about it. But for most car purchases, with Honda or Toyota, there is simply no need for the extended coverage.
I tend to very conservative with my money, and am big on the "better safe than sorry" slogan, but extended warranty coverage is total and utter BUNK.

Spike
 

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Extended Warranty

I have the same philosophy as Spike. Over time, I've probably saved $10,000 on not getting extended warranties that probably would have covered, maybe, $1,000 worth of repairs.

However, I can see two situations where an extended warranty might be justified:

o For those that don't have or can't maintain sufficient emergency funds to cover an unexpected large repair.

o If you can't resist purchasing a vehicle that has a very bad reliability/repair history (although I've found that the extended warranty on such vehicles is very, very expensive - makes sense, huh).
 

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You're forgetting one point. The Prius is not a standard "reliable" Toyota but an entirely new concept of transportation on four wheels almost completely controlled by computers. The dealers in the country who are expected to keep this "noble experiment" running have after several years been shown lacking in interest and experiance. I'm no computer expert but how many computers you use constantly have kept running without a problem or re-booting, or requiring service for "three years, six years or seven years.
I'm not sure about you but I wouldn't have come within ten feet of a Prius without the offer of an extended warranty.
Regardless of how you feel, we are all part of Toyotas "experiment" with a very complicated hybrid mode of power.
This is NO Corolla! Most bets on Japanese reliability are out the window on this car and any extended purchased for less than a thousand dollars may be the best option offered on this car. It certainly would be my first choice and in 60 yrs of car ownership this will be my first warranty purchased.
 

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I can tell you when it goes SOUTH

2001 with 107K miles in the shop for a $4000 battery. We will probably junk the car.
Between a $1500 computer and a dead battery, can't afford to save gas anymore
 
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