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Discussion Starter #1
What is the danger--if any--to a driver or passengers in a Prius of electrocution if involved in a severe accident? Would first responders stand back for fear of being electrocuted if they touch the car?
 

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"Electrocution in a Prius"

Isn't that the title of a song by Cannibal Corpse? Or GWAR maybe?
 

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There is no danger because the HV system is deactivated after an accident. Those clicks you hear from the back of the car are the relays that are connecting the HV battery to the circuit and allowing the car to operate. When you turn off the car the HV circuit is cut (more clicking) and there is no high voltage throughout the vehicle, except for in the main HV batter. The car is totally harmless when it is off.
 

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The established statistical probability is zero - i.e., with hybrids in production since 1997 and some 300,000 hybrids currently on the road, it has never happened.
 

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Simply put:
People shouldn't listen to rumor.
 

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I remember this same worry over "exploding" airbags. First responders train to know what to do with Hybrids. First responders don't worry about the "kind" of car you are driving.

Can it happen? Never say never. However, Osama Bin Laden could rappel into your garage today, a comet could hit your car today, you could have a heart attack today....if we worry about everything, we would never get out of bed in the morning.
 

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And to make things double safe, the fuse/plug on the battery can and should be pulled. This splits the battery in half electrically, rendering it inoperative. Of course if you had severe rear-end damage, they may not be able to get to the plug.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
electrocution in Prius

DanMan32 said:
And to make things double safe, the fuse/plug on the battery can and should be pulled. This splits the battery in half electrically, rendering it inoperative. Of course if you had severe rear-end damage, they may not be able to get to the plug.
Interesting suggestions! I wonder how many "first responders" know of these precautions....
 
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