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You shouldn't have to in Rhode Island as long as you keep your tank fairly full in the winter. I would be a little concerned with the bladder composition and save the dry gas for below zero temps. So far, it looks like "global warming" is going to keep us in the temperate zone in the northeast this winter, while it "socks" the northwest.
 

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hyperion said:
You shouldn't have to in Rhode Island as long as you keep your tank fairly full in the winter. I would be a little concerned with the bladder composition and save the dry gas for below zero temps. So far, it looks like "global warming" is going to keep us in the temperate zone in the northeast this winter, while it "socks" the northwest.
I fill it up then refill it when the light blinks... I rarely top off ...I also generally use a full tank every 1-3 days..does that count as keeing the tank fairly full?

KV
 

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Personally when I leave a car outdoors I will make sure the tank is fairly full. The problem in the winter is half filled tank sitting in the sun all day and the airspace in the tank allowing condensation to form. This should not be a problem in the Prius as the bladder should be descending with the level of fuel and should not leave "that pocket" for condensation to form. In theory you should never need to add dry gas unless you are filling up at a questionable station and getting water in your fuel.
I'de sure get out of the blinking fuel light fill-ups in the winter however. Too many posts of running out of gas using this system in the Prius and I can't imagine anything more unpleasant or dangerous in the winter in New England. It "ain't worth it." I'de be more likely develop a policy of filling up on the pleasant, sunny days regardless of indicated quantity. It just isn't that difficult and it doesn't cost a dime more.
 

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Now that the govt. has mandated use of ethanol in gas you will not need "dry gas". That product is alcohol, usually isopropyl alcohol. It absorbs any water in the tank and as it mixes with gas it also mixes the water with the gas, allowing the engine to burn it. Any of the common alcohols will work. This includes methyl, isopropyl, and ethyl. Methyl alcohol is hard on rubber parts (drys them out allowing them to crack). Isopropyl is less severe at this, and ethyl alcohol is usually considered safe for rubber parts. Ethanol is another name for ethyl alcohol.

If you don't have ethanol commonly in the gas in your area, find a station that sells E10 (10% ethanol). It will work better than "dry gas" and is safer. One tank of this per month would probably ensure you keep all water out of your tank.

For those wondering why this is done (adding "dry gas" or equivalent), in places that get "real winter" water in the fuel tank can get in the fuel lines and freeze. This blocks fuel flow leaving you stranded - usually on a very cold night. Not fun!
 

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The "dry gas" products are to prevent water from freezing in your fuel system. With many states now using E10, most dry gas products are no longer needed.

Be certain that whatever product you use doesn't contain methanol. (some do, so check the ingredient list.) The owner's manual warns against using methanol products in the fuel system.
 

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One more factor is that our (US) Prii have the "Bladder". Since there is never much air in the "Gas Tank", there is also little opportunity for water to condense into the gas and cause any problems.

Again, as stated in several messages above, Dry Gas is not needed or even desirable in our Prii.

Jeffd
 

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While the bladder and sealed fuel system exclude a lot of water from your fuel system, it does nothing to help avoid the water from the gas station. On two occasions in the past I have had water in the fuel from the station. Their tanks can rot in the ground and ground water can enter. You can also get some water in the tank when filling up in the pouring rain - depending on the nozzle type. I once filled up a Subaru 300 km from home and got water with the gas. The car "jerked" on the highway on the way home, and got worse the farther I went. When I got home I removed 20 l of gas and about 1 l of water from the fuel tank. Then I removed more from the carburetor float bowl. That was fun!

Curiously, gas containing alcohol (E10 and E85) are more susceptable to rotting the gas station tanks. The alcohol will absorb water from the air and that water helps support the bacteria that enhance the tank rusting. So while using E10 will help remove any water from your fuel system, it can also cause some to be added if the station has a tank failure.
 

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Even more fun is that the owner's manual also warns not to use gasoline using MMT as an oxygenate, or you can damage the Prius' emission control systems. (MMT also is a source for manganese exposure, too much and it's a neurotoxin (like lead).) MMT isn't used in the US (although the EPA has set limits for its use), but MMT is still in about 5% of the gasoline sold in Canada (as of 2004). Irving Oil and Sunoco's Ultra 94 are known to be MMT free.

http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Can ... ssage/1756

http://www.theicct.org/documents/MMT_ICCT_2004.pdf
http://www.organicconsumers.org/Corp/CanadaMMT.cfm
 
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