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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Local dealers are saying that installing daytime running lights on a US model prius may void part of the warranty?

This modification to meet Canadian law is difficult according to The 2 dealerships I have delt with. Some say a wiring harness has to be rewired, others say power to run has te sourced from the ignition wiring. Some talk of a relay being installed?

DRL have to be the main headlights- not foglamps- according to an official in Transport canada.

Any ideas how to do this and not mess with the warranty?
 

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HID or halogen? If HID, good luck! HID has 2 settings: on and off. High beam is really a repositioning of the beam, not a change of intensity. If halogen, shouldn't be that difficult.

For the halogen system, you have 2 hurdles. One is the taillight relay which when open, turns off all outside lights. This is so the Auto-Off has an easy way to operate. If having the parking lights on during DRL is OK, then the mod can turn this on during Ig1 or Ig2 (ready) and then provide power to the low wattage filament of the halogen.
Or, I suppose you could just force the headlamp relay to come on during Ig-1 or Ig-2. It is ground operated by the body ECU.

Others have claimed that they have used the parking lights to comply via an aftermarket kit, so I don't understand the official's claim. But then the dealers of the aftermarket kit may be uninformed.
 

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If the Canadians just won't let you turn on and use your headlights in the daytime how about a simple mod at your light switch which will just leave your lights on everytime you have 'start' power. That would give you tail-light operation also and sure has to meet the letter of the law.
How ever, I can't believe you are getting the correct info. Toyota would not make the job that difficult when they are manufacturing DRL for models to be sold in other parts of the world. Again, it is probably a dealer that knows little about the car. Give a dealer in Canada a call.

Upon re-reading your post, are you just someone living in the U.S. that wants DRL on your car for U.S. driving? The simplest solution for you is to use your lights in the daytime. ( There is a recent thread concerning an American moving his car and himself to Canada and a dealer in Canada told him the mode is available there.)
 

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Why can't you just leave the headlights on all the time? Prius is smart enough to turn them off when you shut the car off, so you don't have to worry about forgetting to turn them off...;.
 

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I find it hard to believe that DRLs must be headlights. I have seen cars (e.g. Dodge Caravan, Pontiac SV6 etc) that use their indicators or side markers. I think it's more of using the light that's closest to the regulation brightness. Obviously, we can't use our side markers cause they're next to invisible in daylight so use the indicators if you have HIDs since the indicators are in rather large housing and should be large and bright enough to meet regulations.
 

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Go to http://www.riv.ca for information on importing vehicles into Canada..

Judging from the DRL related "safety recalls" listed on the Transport Canada web site, there is *NO* requirement that DRLs be done with headlights.. Fog light-based systems are OK as are turn signal-based systems (but turn signal systems must remain ON during signalling- ie, signal light blinks, other light stays on).

Here's the relevant section of the regulations:
Daytime Running Lamps
General

(44) Every bus, multipurpose passenger vehicle, passenger car, three-wheeled vehicle and truck shall be equipped with two daytime running lamps or, where the daytime running lamps are optically combined with the upper beams of the headlamps, with two or four daytime running lamps.

(45) A daytime running lamp shall be white, yellow or white to yellow, in accordance with sections 3.1.3, 3.1.2 and 3.1.3.1, respectively, of SAE Standard J578, Color Specification (May 1988).

(46) A daytime running lamp that is not optically combined with a headlamp shall conform to SAE Recommended Practice J575, Tests for Motor Vehicle Lighting Devices and Components (December 1988).

(47) Subject to subsection (47.1), a daytime running lamp that is not optically combined with another lamp or is optically combined with a lamp, other than a front fog lamp, that is not required by this section shall be designed to conform to SAE Recommended Practice J2087, Daytime Running Lamps for Use on Motor Vehicles (August 1991), including the photometric values set out in Table 2 of this Recommended Practice, except that

(a) the maximum luminous intensity at any test point shall be 3 000 cd;

(b) the lamp is not required to conform to section 6.2 of that Recommended Practice; and

(c) the effective projected luminous lens area of the lamp may be less than 40 cm2.

(47.1) A daytime running lamp that is not optically combined with another lamp may conform to SAE Standard J583, Front Fog Lamps (June 1993), or to sections 3, 4.2, 4.3, 5 and 6 of ECE Regulation No. 19, Uniform Provisions Concerning the Approval of Motor Vehicle Front Fog Lamps, Revision 3 (March 2, 1993).

(47.2) A daytime running lamp that is optically combined with a front turn signal lamp or a parking lamp shall conform to subsection (47).

(48) A daytime running lamp that is optically combined with a headlamp shall

(a) where combined with the lower beam of a headlamp that is designed to conform to the photometric requirements of this section, operate at normal operating voltage or

(i) in the case of a DC system, not less than 75 per cent and not more than 92 per cent of the normal operating voltage, and

(ii) in the case of an AC system or a modulated voltage system, the equivalent root mean square of not less than 75 per cent and not more than 92 per cent of the normal operating voltage;

(b) where combined with the lower beam of a headlamp that is designed to conform to the photometric requirements of section 108.1, operate at normal operating voltage or

(i) in the case of a DC system, not less than 86 per cent and not more than 92 per cent of the normal operating voltage, and

(ii) in the case of an AC system or a modulated voltage system, the equivalent root mean square of not less than 86 per cent and not more than 92 per cent of the normal operating voltage; and

(c) where combined with the upper beam of a headlamp, be designed to provide a luminous intensity of not less than 2 000 cd and not more than 7 000 cd at test point H-V.

(49) For the purpose of determining if a daytime running lamp conforms to subsection (48), the daytime running lamp shall be tested in accordance with section S11 of TSD 108.

(50) A daytime running lamp that is optically combined with a headlamp or headlamps in which two filaments operate together to provide the daytime running lamp function shall meet the photometric requirements of paragraph (48)(c) when

(a) the daytime running lamp is provided by

(i) an upper beam that is provided by two filaments in the headlamp,

(ii) an upper beam and a lower beam of the headlamp, or

(iii) an upper beam of the headlamp, and a lower beam or upper beam of another headlamp; and

(b) the luminous intensities at the test point H-V of each headlamp, tested in accordance with section S10 of TSD 108, are added together.

(51) Where a daytime running lamp is optically combined with a headlamp that is activated in its concealed position, the daytime running lamp shall conform to subsection (47), (48) or (50).

(52) A daytime running lamp may be optically combined with a front fog lamp that conforms to SAE Standard J583, Front Fog Lamps (June 1993) or to sections 3, 4.2, 4.3, 5 and 6 of ECE Regulation No. 19, Uniform Provisions Concerning the Approval of Motor Vehicle Front Fog Lamps, Revision 3 (2 March 1993).

(53) Despite subsections (45) to (52), a vehicle may be equipped with a daytime running light system that conforms to Canadian Standards Association Standard CAN/CSA-D603-88, Daytime Running Light Systems (April 1988), other than a Type 4 and Type 5 system (reduced voltage upper beam headlamps), as indicated in Table 1 of the Standard, if

(a) the daytime running light system components are installed in accordance with the instructions referred to in section 8.2 of the Standard; and

(b) where the vehicle is equipped with gaseous-discharge lower beam headlamps, only a Type 1 system (normal voltage lower beam headlamp) or a Type 6 or Type 7 system (separate lamps other than headlamps), as indicated in Table 1 of the Standard, is used.



Switching

(54) Subject to subsections (55) and (56), daytime running lamps shall be on continuously when the engine is operating and the master lighting switch is not in the headlamps on position.

(55) Daytime running lamps may switch off

(a) while the automatic transmission control is in the park or neutral position;

(b) while the parking brake is applied; or

(c) after the engine is started but prior to the vehicle being set in motion for the first time.

(56) A daytime running lamp that is optically combined with a turn signal lamp shall switch off while the turn signal lamp is switched on as a turn signal or hazard warning signal.

(57) Daytime running lamps shall switch off

(a) whenever the master lighting switch is moved to the headlamps on position; and

(b) where the lamps are on a vehicle equipped with concealable headlamps and the master light switch is moved to the headlamps on position, once the headlamps attain the fully open position.

(58) Where the lower beams of the headlamps operating at normal operating voltage are used as daytime running lamps,

(a) it shall not be possible to activate the upper beams of the headlamps except for signalling purposes;

(b) where there is a tell-tale that is automatically activated, and visible to the driver, in dark ambient light conditions to indicate that the tail lamps, licence plate lamps, side marker lamps and parking lamps are switched off, those lamps shall not come on automatically; and

(c) where there is no tell-tale that is automatically activated, the lamps referred to in paragraph (b)

(i) shall come on automatically and remain on in all ambient light conditions, or

(ii) shall come on automatically in dark ambient light conditions.

(59) Despite section S5.5.1 of TSD 108, the lower beams and upper beams of the headlamps may be activated simultaneously when the headlamps are in use as daytime running lamps.

(60) Despite section S5.5.10(d) of TSD 108, daytime running lamps may be wired to flash for signalling purposes.



Visibility

(61) Daytime running lamps that are not optically combined with another lamp required by this section shall be located at the same height, as far apart as practicable and not less than 380 mm and not more than 2 110 mm above the road surface, measured from the H-V axis of the lamp with the vehicle at curb mass.

(62) A daytime running lamp shall be visible from any point contained within the solid angle bounded by vertical planes 20 degrees to the left and right of, and horizontal planes 10 degrees above and below, the H-V axis of the lamp.

(63) Where the distance, measured on a vertical transverse plane, from the H-V axis of a front turn signal lamp to the exposed edge of the lens of a daytime running lamp that is not optically combined with the turn signal lamp is less than 100 mm,

(a) the turn signal lamp shall conform to the photometric requirements of Table 3 of SAE Standard J588, Turn Signal Lamps for Use on Motor Vehicles Less Than 2032 mm in Overall Width (November 1984), using a luminous intensity multiplier of 2.5;

(b) the luminous intensity of the daytime running lamp shall not be more than 2 600 cd at any point in the beam; or

(c) the daytime running lamp shall switch off while the turn signal lamp is flashing.

(64) The inner surface of a transparent component, through which light emitted by a daytime running lamp that conforms to subsection (51) passes, shall be accessible for cleaning without the use of any tool designed specifically for vehicles.

(65) A daytime running lamp shall meet the requirements of sections S5.1.3 and S5.3.1.1 of TSD 108.
 

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I have friend here in Ottawa, Canada who brought his US car back to Canada. He enquired and was told he could adapt his orange (whatever they are called) lights, so he had a dealer in North Carolina wire them up to be always on while driving. His car was inspected here, and it was approved.

This should be a minor adaption which would permit any US car to meet Canadian regulations.

Leo, Ottawa
 

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Leo said:
I have friend here in Ottawa, Canada who brought his US car back to Canada. He enquired and was told he could adapt his orange (whatever they are called) lights, so he had a dealer in North Carolina wire them up to be always on while driving. His car was inspected here, and it was approved.

This should be a minor adaption which would permit any US car to meet Canadian regulations.
http://www.webelectricproducts.com/ sells a module which modifies the front turn signals so they operate as DRLs. They still operate normally as turn signals but if the car is on and the parking lights are off, the turn signals are illuminated much like on many GM cars. I've installed the module on two cars including my 2005 Prius and it works like a champ. I've posted instructions with pictures - just search for my posts or send me a private message.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
DRL

I live in Canada and have bought a vehicle in New hampshire. It has to conform to the criteria of Transport Canada before the Registry of Vehicles will allow the importation of the vehicle.

It would seem by the criteria published from the regulations allows signal lights to be modified.

I tried to order the web electric product relay but the web order form would not allow me to add it to a cart.

David
 

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Having the headlights come on at READY should be simple enough. Very similar to the FOG switch override. Have a relay provide ground to the body ECU input that turns the headlights on. I'd have to see if Auto-off would still work, as I think the body ECU controls the headlighs. You could include a circuit that would disengage the bypass relay if the parking brake was engaged.
 

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If you're using the Webelectric DRL module on your signal lights, be aware that pursuant to a Transport Canada ruling, you *cannot* use the "synchronized mode"- ie the mode where the other light turns off when you are signalling. TC requires that the non-signalling light remains *ON* (of course, that doesn't stop you from leaving the mode off for inspection and then enabling it once you've got your import certificate).
 

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kirby said:
Don't get it -- my '02 in the USA has DRL!
DRL is standard on all Canadian Prius. But, for the 2004-? model years, there is no option for the HID headlights.

There was no DRL option in the US for the 2001 model year.

If you wanted DRLs on your 2002-2003 US Prius, you had to order it that way from the factory. otherwise, there's a lot of wiring you have to to for factory DRLs (relay, wiring harness, etc.)

For the 2004-? US Prius, again there is no option for factory DRLs. Most likely similar problem retrofitting the Canadian DRL parts to a US Prius as was seen on the 2002-2003 Prius...
 
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