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I was wondering if the ICE in the Prius can be converted to use CNG and am wondering if anyone knows how difficult this may be. Honda is selling home CNG fueling units and since CNG is a fuel not dependent on foreign sources ( well, Canada in some cases) I think it might be a good thing to look at. Oil is not going to get any cheaper and although all energy sources are going to increase in price, I would rather give my dollars to a domestic supplier than a foreign one.

I have also read that an ICE run on CNG requires oil changes once a year and will last virtually forever because of the cleanliness of the fuel. Wouldn't mind replacing the battery every 200,000 mi. if the rest of the car holds up.
 

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will last virtually forever
Sorry, but that is absolutely false.

With a traditional vehicle, the wear of the piston-rings starts to become obvious somewhere around 200,000 miles. With a Prius, they will last longer, but definitely not forever.

Also, don't forget that your annual state taxes will likely be very expensive if you use CNG... because that is when they collect them. Refueling at home, rather than a station, does not make you exempt. They still get your money.
 

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Jonnycat26 said:
hyperion said:
And johnycat, that should be "maybe" as there has been no test subject yet.
Except the tons of CNG cars the State of NJ (and I'm sure NJ isn't alone) uses perhaps?

Cough, cough.
Yup, the State of NJ has used CNG cars for years.
 

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Many of the municipal CNG cars are built that way from the factory. Such as:
Ford Crown Victoria
Honda Civic GX
Ford F150
Toyota Camry
Dodge Ram

and others found in the dedicated CNG or bi-fuel natural gas (CNG) listings here:
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/byfuel/b ... peNF.shtml
 

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hyperion said:
Does the State of New Jersey keep their municipal cars long enough to put 200,000 miles on them or are they like the rest of government agencies? 100,000 miles seems to be a "No, No, in Massachusetts.
Given that state workers were tooling around in K Cars in the mid 80s, I'd say NJ likes to hold on to the cars as long as they keep running. And in some cases, beyond that.
 
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