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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bought a used 2004 Prius with 19000 miles. Just had it's 25000 miles service, actually it was at 27500 miles. Dealer stated that my front brakes have only 10% left on them and need replaced. Is this wear normal? I don't know how the previous owner drove the car. I'm getting the pad replaced next week. What is the normal life of the pads?
Thanks,
Bob
 

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To the best of my knowledge, Pikachu's brake pads have never been replaced. 2001 Prius, 4.8 years old, 108K miles. Latest inspection (last Tuesday) said 75% remaining. Now mind you, the vast majority of those miles are freeway commute.
 

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WOW. Because of the regen braking, you really shouldn't have to even think about replacing those brakes until nearly 100K!

I would question how the previous owner drove that car if there's only 10% left on the brake pads. Must have really beaten on it...
 

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Are the brakes just along for the ride (freeway use)? If so they will not wear out fast. My sense is that a typical sedan, driven normally with a 50-50 mix of city/freeway will go 25-45K. On the other hand, my Mitsubishi, which has been driven extremely hard is on its 4th set of pads at 27K.
 

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This may be off-topic. When I picked up my new Prius about 3 weeks ago, the service manager made a point to tell me that while the front brakes were disc, the rear brakes are drums and need periodic adjustment (they are not 'self-adjusting' like American cars). It sounded strange to me for such an advanced car. Can anyone "in the know" comment about the rear brakes?
 

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The European version has four wheel disks. May be account of laws in Europe but here is a "price" thing. The car, afterall does not have the performance parameter to require the four wheel disks.
The Prius was built to deliver high milage figures with the lowest emmissions on the planet. They have totally succceeded. Now the cost factor comes into the act. If you want high tech brakes, suspension, and creature comforts like telescoptic steering wheels, adjustable and comfortable seats, engine guages other than a speedo you can get them with a Lexas or Highlander. Just add $15,000
The Prius is at the top of technology for it's drive system but at the bottom for everything else. "but that A/C system is the cats meow"
 

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brake life

helmkera said:
This may be off-topic. When I picked up my new Prius about 3 weeks ago, the service manager made a point to tell me that while the front brakes were disc, the rear brakes are drums and need periodic adjustment (they are not 'self-adjusting' like American cars)...quote]

In the 2001 Prius, the rear drum brakes look *exactly* like self-adjusting assemblies that I have seen before. They can be manually adjusted, but so can the others. The new model has not regressed, I am sure. Minus one point for your service manager.

After 78k miles, I still have very thick pads and shoes at all 4 corners. In (Vancouver's famous) taxi service, front replacements were on 50k mile intervals and rears 100k. Or something like that.

DAS
 

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Brake Wear

2002 Prius, 51,000 miles - Front brakes 10% worn.
1998 Camry, 78,000 miles - Front brakes 50% worn.
1984 Mazda Rx7, 135,000 miles - Brakes replaced, but could have lasted another 10-20,000 miles

With regenerative braking and gradual, anticipated stops, we are hoping that the Prius brakes will last as long as we own it (150-200,000 miles).

80% city driving, suburban areas, 45 mph. traffic lights approximately every mile, average commute time 35 minutes one way.
 

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First of all, there is no laws in europe that states that a car has to have disc brakes. A lot of cars has rear drum brakes, and here in sweden it actually is a rather good solution since we use salt on the roads to keep them free from ice. The salt makes everything corrode, so the extra protection that drums offer is good.

Of course the rear brakes is self adjusting, problem is that after 5 years the crap is all stuck so it doesn´t self adjust anymore. And thats the big backside of drum brakes, they need lots of cleaning and greasing to work correctly.
 

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Break Life

I have changed many,many break pads and shoes. The life of a pad or shoe is in the drivers style of driving and breaking.

I have seen 17 yr old trucks with the original rear break shoes at 225k miles and new suv's with 5K miles in need of turning the disk! All related to the driver style of driving and breaking.

With regen. breaking which should reduce the need for normal breaking, I am counting on never changing my breaks and I keep cars well over 200K.
 

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I was going 45,000 to 55,000 on a set of brakes with my stick shift cars.

I read once about a guy driving a Prius I as a taxi in NYC. If I recall correctly, he reportedly got 95,000 to 96,000 miles on his first set of front brake pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Brakes

I'll get then check out. Do you need to go to the delaer or can a "brake shop" take care of it. I have one "brake shop I have used for years for my other cars. He is not the cheapest but I trust him.
Bob
 

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A "brake shop" can take care of the brake pads and other mechanicals. The computer controlled skid control might need a high tech "brake shop" with the testing tool, or possibly even a Toyota service department.
 
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