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Discussion Starter #1
Does any one know what the expected battery life is or had one long enough that it needed replaced?

Looking to buy a Prius and am curious about the cost of maintenance.

Any info would help.

John
 

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no one has ever worn one out to find out how long it takes to replace. Toyota says it's made to last the life of the car. Warranty is 100k miles most places and 150k in California and states that have adopted the CA emissions standards.

It's really a non-issue.
 

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We now have a handful of reports from owners having exceeded 150,000 miles with the battery-pack still going strong.

There haven't been any reports at all about a replacement ever being needed.

The design very carefully monitors charging & discharging, never allowing the level to waiver much beyond the middle. In fact, when you look at the Multi-Display, all you are seeing is the middle. The "too low" and "too high" ranges are not shown for that very reason. You simply don't ever use them.

That is not true of the original model, manual transmission Honda though. It actually does allow you to deep-discharge. So naturally, reports are now coming in of Honda having to replace those packs. Fortunately, Honda is paying for it. And thankfully, not a single Honda CVT owner has ever reported having that problem. Their charge-level is carefully controlled by the computer instead, like Prius, preventing stress that the manual transmission actually allows.

It was pretty obvious from the start that careful system monitoring of the battery-pack would ensure long life. But without data, we couldn't prove it. A few years from now, we'll have so much it won't even be a concern anymore. The misconception about replacement will simply be a memory from the past and people will take it for granted that the design works.

Think about it. Back when automatic transmissions were first introduced to mid-priced cars, people wondered about performance & reliability. That was in the 60's for cars and the 80's for trucks. Now, 90% of the US population prefers automatics. Things have changed a lot. In fact, when you start digging, you'll find similar concerns about things like front-wheel-drive too. Many thought there was no way all that could be squashed into the front-end of a vehicle and still perform competitively with the traditional design. That obviously wasn't true. It worked.
 
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Actually, there has been one report on this forum or on PriusChat, where a lady was looking for a replacement pack for her boyfriend's classic prius. I think it had 250K on it, and was a 2002. Dealer wanted $6K, but she was able to find a used one salvage, net cost $1800 installed reluctantly by the dealer. Again, I am working from memory on my specifics, but I am fairly sure I am at least close.

Right after that, she got quite a few requests as to the wear and maintenance of the rest of the car. Things such as brake pad/shoe wear, any other powertrain wear, etc.

I suppose you could think of it as an automatic transmission cost. A good AT should last a good long time, but eventually it will need to be fixed or replaced.
 

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Considering anything in excess of 200,000 miles can be thought of as gravy, especially since no reputable accountant would ever allow depreciation to be figured beyond the 150,000 mark.

Unfortunately, that single report at 250,000 lacks any detail. It would be great to know more... like how it was determined that replacement was needed and how realistic module swapping would be instead.

The transmission is an excellent point. Automatics require attention later in life. The Planetary-CVT mostly likely will not. It should last as long as the vehicle itself, since Differentials do and the design is nearly identical to them.
 

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Sorry about the GUEST entry, I was expecting to be promted for a login before the post would go through.

Check out this thread, it has the details you seek.
http://www.priusonline.com/viewtopic.php?t=1842

I agree, 250K miles is gravy, but still, stating that NOBODY reported a problem with the battery is wrong. Eventually, it will wear out. However, its life expectancy is long enough to where the car may be put out to pasture for any number of reasons, as any car would, such as engine, transmission, body, or even plain old "Time for a new car".
 

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We need details... like what the heck people think "life expectency" is in the first place. That 250,000 mile report seriously lacked them, hence not quickly remembering it. All they wanted was a replacement, with no reason why except that it was "needed".

Keep in mind that northern & southern vehicle life varies dramatically, as does the expectation of a Japanese vehicle verses one built in Detroit.

180,000 MILES IS WHAT TOYOTA STATES AS AN EXPECTED AVERAGE. That's great, but is too vague to be really informative. Nonetheless, the average consumer desires a generic value anyway. So, use that.
 

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and we can't forget that Classic Prius taxi in Vancouver that clocked over 200,000kms in 3 yrs with nary a problem.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Life expectancy

Hey- anything over 100K is gravy if you ask me. All machines eventually break though and it's good check on weaknesses and strenghts of new designs. I know its a Toyota- My family has seen 5 Toyotas go 180K without anything but oil, tires, and brakes. The only part that could be a question was the battery- Sometimes re-charbables just wont re-charge.

As for the engine and tranny (basically anything mechanical) in this thing marvelous. My wife & I just lost our Echo in an accident (We miss that car- hit a rock @45mph and smashed the transmission and engine but no one hurt)- the same 1.5 VVTi 4 cyl that's in the Prius. The CVT is absolutely ingenious implementation in a car in combo with the electric drive and regenerative braking. It's a very well designed machine.

Makes me wanna get a job @ the Toyota dealership- I'm gonna miss tinkering under the hood of my car. I have been the black sheep of the family preferring the sort of car that needs a little maintenance. And I'll miss driving a rear-wheel with 5speed. But I'll not miss gettin 20 mpg from the Mustang....a car I believe will need major repairs before 100K.


Thank you all for your help!
 
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The four cylinder in the Prius is not identical to any other recep. Different stroke, no starter and would not work in any car but a hybrid.
 

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ravinraven said:
Does any one know what the expected battery life is or had one long enough that it needed replaced?
I'm an electrical engineer, and I've done a lot of research so I could assure myself the battery was "safe" before I bought a gas-electric car. Right now it appears:

- the battery will last as long as the engine
- unless you abuse the battery (lots of stop-n-go) -or- the battery reaches 20 years


The reason is because Toyota designed the car for minimal battery usage, so that it is never stressed.
 

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ravinraven said:
Does any one know what the expected battery life is or had one long enough that it needed replaced?

Looking to buy a Prius and am curious about the cost of maintenance.

Any info would help.

John
To quote Toyota's press release:
http://pressroom.toyota.com/photo_libra ... d=20040623
<quote>
How long does the Prius battery last and what is the replacement cost?

The Prius battery (and the battery-power management system) has been
designed to maximize battery life. In part this is done by keeping the
battery at an optimum charge level - never fully draining it and never
fully recharging it. As a result, the Prius battery leads a pretty
easy life. We have lab data showing the equivalent of 180,000 miles
with no deterioration and expect it to last the life of the vehicle.
We also expect battery technology to continue to improve: the
second-generation model battery is 15% smaller, 25% lighter, and has
35% more specific power than the first. This is true of price as well.
Between the 2003 and 2004 models, service battery costs came down 36%
and we expect them to continue to drop so that by the time
replacements may be needed it won't be a much of an issue. Since the
car went on sale in 2000, Toyota has not replaced a single battery for
wear and tear.
</quote>

As for cost of regular maintenance,
view the scheduled maintenance guide
online, and then call you local dealers
to see how much they charge:
http://www.toyotapartsandservice.com/sm ... icle=Prius
 
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