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Folks,

I just checked the"FAQ" and "Search" feature and didn't find answers to the following two questions concerning RFI generated by the Prius power system on after market electronics:

(1) A CB radio. Has anyone installed one? Problems? (There is a thread on installation of a HAM radio, but nothing covering the line of sight freq range)

(2) A Garmin GPS. Yes I know that GPS is an option, but I'm not sure if it is DVD driven or SatCom driven. Of course Satellite Radio is also an option, so maybe I just answered my own question.

Any assistance would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Fred 8)
 

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River Rat said:
(2) A Garmin GPS. Yes I know that GPS is an option, but I'm not sure if it is DVD driven or SatCom driven. Of course Satellite Radio is also an option, so maybe I just answered my own question.
The onboard navigation system uses a GPS satellite receiver under the dashboard to pinpoint position; and uses a DVD-ROM based library to access maps, with the DVD-ROM drive hiding under the driver's seat. It interfaces with the large built-in touch-screen, and from what I've heard, the version in the 2006 model is much better than the older version.

And yes, satellite radio is a possible add-on, although I think it's still not 'official'. (i.e. You can put a Toyota-brand satellite receiver in, and it will interface natively with the onboard radio, including touch-screen, but Toyota doesn't officially support it yet.) But satellite radio works 100% differently than any navigation system. Nav systems get their signal from a group of low-orbit satellites that are constantly moving. Radio gets its signal from a single (per sat provider) geostationary satellite that appears to be stationary. (I say 'appears' to appease any physics purists that may be reading.) Just because something supports one doesn't necessarily imply support for the other.

(Double-checking, it looks like XM is now an official 'accessory' for the Prius. Available April 2006?!)
 

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CB is so low power that it shouldn't be an issue to put one in. If you plan on hard wiring it to the vehicle, that might be a problem as there are only so many places you can pull constant 12v power from. You'd probably be better off using one of the 12v power points to power the radio rather than mess around with trying to find a constant 12v power source. However those that have put in ham radios are better at letting you know if it works out. Aside from the fact that Ham is much more powerful and there is a much greater portion of the spectrum available to them the basic install should be the same as a some kind of ham unit.

As for a Garmin GPS, they are pretty much self contained anymore. In the case of the i, c or Quest series, mount it to your windshield, or in the case of California, stick that annoying disc to your dash and then attach to that (stupid California rule, I'm surprised they don't ban rearview mirrors that are attached to the windshield :twisted: ). GPS signals are pretty much line of site clear sky and so long as there is windshield glass over the unit you should get very good reception.
 

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ehurtley said:
Radio gets its signal from a single (per sat provider) geostationary satellite that appears to be stationary. (I say 'appears' to appease any physics purists that may be reading.)
XM: Two geostationary-ish satellites. (A third is currently aloft and being tested, but perhaps that's too much detail...)
Sirius: three elliptically orbiting sats, two of which should always be visible from anywhere in the continental U.S.

That's why, in theory, S reception may be better for moving vehicles, whereas X provides easier antenna aiming for stationary receivers such as home or office.

Having said that, my self-installed Prius XM receiver rarely drops out.
 
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