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Discussion Starter #1
In browsing
this web site I am baffled by the acronyms.
Would someone please supply me with a glossary for
these:
ICE, IMO, EV, MFD, DOP, GBS, ECU
There are probably more yet to be encountered, but
these would be a good start. Thank you in advance
to all of you who respond.
Cheers! Edward
 

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There's an acronym glossary here:

http://priuschat.com/forums/archive/o_t ... dated.html

But, it's pretty long, so I'll tell ya the ones you asked specifically about:

ICE = Internal Combustion Engine
IMO = In My Opinion
EV = Electric Vehicle
MFD = Multi-Function Display
DOP = Date of Purchase
GBS = I'm not sure of this one. If you mean GPS, that is the Global Positioning System or Nav System
ECU = Electronic Control Unit
 

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grammer police

:D grammer police :D

those are abreviations, not acronyms, acronyms have to be a word on their own, like MASH or SCUBA

where did you see DOP, context might tell what it means

Spike
 

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Re: grammer police

Spike said:
:D grammer police :D

those are abreviations, not acronyms, acronyms have to be a word on their own, like MASH or SCUBA

where did you see DOP, context might tell what it means

Spike
Main Entry: ac·ro·nym
Pronunciation: 'a-kr&-"nim
Function: noun
Etymology: acr- + -onym
: a word (as NATO, radar, or snafu) formed from the initial letter or letters of each of the successive parts or major parts of a compound term; also : an abbreviation (as FBI) formed from initial letters : INITIALISM
- ac·ro·nym·ic /"a-kr&-'ni-mik/ adjective
- ac·ro·nym·i·cal·ly /-mi-k(&-)lE/ adverb

If FBI is an acronym according to the dictionary, then these are too.
 

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Re: grammer police

Spike said:
:D grammer police :D
:D spelling police :D

It's "grammar" :!:

For some reason, this reminds me of a coupon that was stuffed our front door a few years ago. It offered a member of the household a "free glammer makeover."
 

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Re: grammer police

coloradospringsprius said:
Spike said:
:D grammer police :D
:D spelling police :D

It's "grammar" :!:

For some reason, this reminds me of a coupon that was stuffed our front door a few years ago. It offered a member of the household a "free glammer makeover."
I think there are those on the 'net, too. Spammer makeover... Or was it Spammar? ;)
 

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Re: grammer police

Sanny said:
coloradospringsprius said:
Spike said:
:D grammer police :D
:D spelling police :D

It's "grammar" :!:

For some reason, this reminds me of a coupon that was stuffed our front door a few years ago. It offered a member of the household a "free glammer makeover."
I think there are those on the 'net, too. Spammer makeover... Or was it Spammar? ;)
"Oh, Sanny ... you look especially spammerous tonight!"
 

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"those are abreviations, not acronyms, acronyms have to be a word on their own, like MASH or SCUBA"

Not really. An acronym is created from only the first letters of a phrase or title. An abbreviation does not necessarily just use first letters.
 

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Edward said:
In browsing
this web site I am baffled by the acronyms.
Would someone please supply me with a glossary for
these:
ICE, IMO, EV, MFD, DOP, GBS, ECU
Edward
ICE-something the British do not put in drinks
IMO-incorrect spelling for an Ostrich-like animal
EV-My aunt Eva's nickname
GBS-baby talk for gbs
ECU-another incorrect spelling for an Ostrich-like animal

:eek: :?
 

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Re: grammer police

coloradospringsprius said:
"Oh, Sanny ... you look especially spammerous tonight!"
Oh, pshaw! ::::fluttering lashes:::: You say the sweetest things.

Of course, now that raises the question of whether they spell it "grammour" in Britain...
 

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Not sure what DOP is, that's what is displayed on the scan tool customizing menu when following the proceedure to enable the alarm.

THHT: Toyota Hand Held Tool
FWIW: For what it's worth.
 

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I think FBI is an acronym only if you pronounce it "fubbie". I don't know the source of the posted definition, but the ones I looked up all require the resulting thing be a "word", like WAC or RADAR.

Therfore I think this thread is a PRIUSICK: Positively Ridiculous Interminable Unfounded Silly Investigation Considered Kooky.

And I don't know what DOP is either, but it is pronouncible. Don't Open Prius? Dang Old Poster? Durable Oxygenated Propellant?
 

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Bleh.

Technically, FBI is not an acronym, as was pointed out, but an initialism. It is still an abbreviation -- "abbreviation" is a big group which includes acronyms, initialisms, and lots of other things. Initialism is anything where you refer to a phrase by its initials (e.g., FBI, IMO); acronym is a particular flavor of initialism, where the result is something that's said and treated as word, not as a series of letters (e.g., radar, laser).

However, the usage of the word "acronym" has steadily drifted to the point where it is generally considered acceptable to use it to refer to all initialisms, and most dictionaries now reflect this broader usage.

Words change and evolve. But this is one of the bad evolutions, because we used to have two words that precisely defined two different things, and now we have two words whose meanings are blurred enough that there's no longer a way to precisely say what you used to be able to say in a single word. But it's inevitable, a long-lost battle. Embrace blurriness!

Wait, what was this thread about again?
 

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HunterGreen said:
Bleh.

Technically, FBI is not an acronym, as was pointed out, but an initialism. It is still an abbreviation -- "abbreviation" is a big group which includes acronyms, initialisms, and lots of other things. Initialism is anything where you refer to a phrase by its initials (e.g., FBI, IMO); acronym is a particular flavor of initialism, where the result is something that's said and treated as word, not as a series of letters (e.g., radar, laser).

However, the usage of the word "acronym" has steadily drifted to the point where it is generally considered acceptable to use it to refer to all initialisms, and most dictionaries now reflect this broader usage.

Words change and evolve. But this is one of the bad evolutions, because we used to have two words that precisely defined two different things, and now we have two words whose meanings are blurred enough that there's no longer a way to precisely say what you used to be able to say in a single word. But it's inevitable, a long-lost battle. Embrace blurriness!

Wait, what was this thread about again?
According to http://www.wordorigins.org

What is an acronym?
The term itself only dates from the 1940s and is from the Greek akros, meaning point, and onuma, meaning name. An acronym is an abbreviation formed from the first letters of a series of words. Some authorities insist that an acronym must be pronounced as one word (e.g., NATO is an acronym, AAA, for American Automobile Association, is not), but not all agree with this. Those that use the limited definition generally distinguish between word acronyms (e.g., NATO) and initialisms (e.g., BBC).

There are some modern words with acronymic origins (e.g., radar, scuba). But acronyms, as opposed to initialisms, came into English usage during the First World War (e.g., ANZAC for Australia-New Zealand Army Corps, AWOL for Absent WithOut Leave). The only previous instance of a word with acronymic origins was a brand name from the late-nineteenth century (i.e., Seroco for Sears Roebuck Company).

Initialisms existed, but were not common, prior to WWI. Mencken does not cite a single example of an initialism dating earlier than the nineteenth century, and he dates the widespread use of initialisms to the 1920s, with a usage explosion during the 1930s with the New Deal.

Although no pre-twentieth century examples of acronymic word origins exist, the concept of the acronym, while rare, was not unknown in earlier times. Occasionally, phrases would be made where the first letters of each word in the phrase spelled out an existing word.
 
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