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Anyone know what's in the airconditioner now that freon is illegal? I hope it's something environmentally friendly in keeping with the rest of the car.
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I don't think Freon (R-12, if I remember correctly) is "illegal." It just can't be used in new cars. If it were made completely illegal, people with older cars would never be able to fix their air conditioning systems.

Conversions are too expensive for a lot of people, and often don't work as well as the original system.

The "new" refrigerant (R-124 or R-135 or something like that...but my memory is terrible here...) is what's in new cars. For automotive air conditioning to work, we still need to use a refrigerant of some sort. Something that's gaseous at room temperature and liquid at very low temperatures and/or very high pressures.

I don't know what type of refrigerant the Prius uses, but I know it's not R-12.
 

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New A/C sytems run off of R-134a. Usualy a conversion cost anywhere between 500 and 1000. R-12 is technically "illegal". Or, at least illegal for any licensed A/C mechanic to supply. I've seen a few though. On older cars, like my old 87 Lincoln Mark VII, they made me change the A/C sytem for 750.00.
 

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I'm on a waiting list my my 04 Prius, #9 Silver so I'm presently driving an older car that uses the R12 and I get it serviced every few years. R12 cannot be purchased outright but it can be purchased through an a/c service garage with them doing the installation ONLY.

Several years back the R12 went out of production and shops bought up whatever was left. It costs me a few hundered dollars for service and one can of R12. This service use to be around $40.

All new freon is environment friendly.
 

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V8Cobrakid said:
R-12 is technically "illegal". Or, at least illegal for any licensed A/C mechanic to supply.
R12 is not illegal. It is in phase-out, meaning it is available in reduced amounts each year. As a result, the price of R12 is now over $100 per pound (most recharges take 1 - 3 pounds), thus conversions to R-134a are getting more popular. For some older vehicles, the receiver/dryer will not work with R-134a and therefore conversions are very expensive, requiring new compressors and receivers. The average 80's and 90's vehicle can be converted for a few hundred dollars (mostly labor).
 
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