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I know this subject has bounced around in the groups a bit. I have an appointment this Tuesday morning to have it done. Went to Keyes Toyota in Van Nuys to make the appointment and talked to the service rep that handles the Prius. I requested 5w-30 oil and that they rotate the tires crossing front to rear and straight up rear to front. I also asked them to inflate tires to 42/40 and check alignment to be sure that it was .05 on each side for a total of .10 toe in for no extra charge. The rep said after phoning somebody from his office/station that all would be done. I almost fainted! We'll see what really happens. I plan to mark the tires somehow to give them a unique identity. We'll see what really happens. Anything I'm forgetting here?? Thanks!

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I'm confused about this tire rotation thing. The diagram on page 216 of my 2002 Prius owners manual indicates front to back rotation (not crossing sides). Like this rotation option "D" shown at tirerack.com.



The tirerack.com website shows 5 different rotation patterns.

<http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/general/rotate.htm>

It is interesting that the rotation scheme shown in the Prius manual is shown as tirerack option "D" for "directional wheels or tires". Are the Potenzas directional? I'm guessing probably not.

Also, the tire rotation you mention is listed at the above link as rotation option "C". Tirerack say that rotation option "C" is for rear wheel or four wheel drive cars.



For front wheel drive cars tirerack.com recommends rotation option "A" shown below.



Why would option "C" be better for rear wheel drive while option "A" is better for front wheel drive? My guess is that option "A" or "C" are fine as long as you are consistent about requesting the same tire rotation scheme every time you get the tires rotated.

Interestingly tirerack says option "B" below is OK for either front wheel or rear wheel drive.



I'm guessing I'll use tire rotation "A" each time I switch between summer tires and winter tires. That is unless someone can convince me that the Potenzas are "directional" and that I should use the rotation method diagramed on page 216 of my 2002 owners manual (option "D").

Ed
 
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Diagram "A" is the one I prefer on front wheel drive cars. Potenzas are NOT directional.
 
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Got my service done today and thought I would share the alignment results. Is this takes too much bandwidth feel free to delete. I was surprised at the results. Keyes Toyota did everything I asked without question. Very positive experience.

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From Past experience on My 99 Front wheel drive Buick Regal, By rotating them diagonally , it sure as "H" made the tires run with increased noise level, and even affected the steering and reduced gas milage. No way I would switch these El Chepo's other than front to back and back to front with tread running same direction.
It's only been a few years that they reccommend this criss-cross method on radial tires and I am sure it's a big ripoff by the tire manufacturers so they can sell more tires! In addition the 7500 mile service in my opinion is too long. I service my Buick every 3,000 and plan to service my Prius every 5,000 as reccommended by my TOYOTA dealer! I sure as H don't want any sludge problems from runnung on a COLD engine!

Regards,
Don Good
 
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Re: Tire Rotation Discrepancy!

Well Gentlemen, this looks like the answer. In my 2002 manual it shows strait front to rear and rear to front rotation on Page 216. Now in my 2001 Owners Manual which they sent me back last September while I was waiting the 6 months for delivery, it shows diagonal cris-crossing on page 213. Apparently the 2001 reccomendation was a bummer!!!

regards,
Don Good
 
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Re: Tire Rotation Discrepancy!

There seems to be a bit of confusion or room for interpretation here with regard to rotation. First let me say that I really don't know first thing about the finer technical aspects of automobiles through any kind of experience or education. For Pete's sake (neither Snyder nor Blackford) I'm a musician! There are many thoughtful and seemingly knowledgable participants in these Prius groups and clubs, and when Priusman and ee were participating, most people were comfortable taking their word as final. Logic dictates that we follow what Toyota says in their manual and for the most part, that is what's recommended by these groups, however, the manual has said two different things in two different years as far as tire rotation goes. I will assume that Toyota changed their minds for a reason. What could that be? People often disregard the manual (with all models)as to oil change frequency opting for shorter intervals. I understand that the only possible downside of this behavior might be unnecessary outlay of cash or consumption of oil. Is crossing the tires from the rear on the way to the front (or vice-versa) if one remains consistent, detrimental?
I have sensed a majority of people (I could be mistaken ) who have impressed me as knowledgable in the groups, have decided to have each of their tires in all four locations over the course of three rotations. If these original Potenzas are non directional as most people agree they are, (which I assume means being able to switch sides with impunity) doesn't it make some sort of sense to do so for even tire wear? This also makes sense to me in that there seems a consensus based on owners experience, that the left front tire takes more of a beating due to weight distribution in the Prius than the others. In my mother's case, it would be due to her reluctance to make left turns in traffic! Thoughts anyone? (Not about my mother,please!)

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Re: Tire Rotation Discrepancy!

Rotating tires front to back on the same side of the car is an old theory from the Firestone 500 days. It turned out that the tires couldn't handle changing directions only because they weren't any good. Any info from tire manufactures that I've seen recommends rotating fronts straight back and crossing the rears to the opposite front wheel. I suspect that someone at Toyota who is still living in the 70's got transferred to the owner's manual editing department
 
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Re: Tire Rotation Discrepancy!

Here is my observation: Criss crossing tires will reduce gas milage, increase road noise significantly, and will cause steering and handling problems. Don't let anyone tell you that the tires are not bi-directional. On my 2002 which have Bridgestone Potenza-RE92, P175-65-R14-84S, Extra Load, MAX Pressure 50 PSI, Treadwear 160, Traction A, Temperature A (Best grade tires you can get), the tires on the right side of the car have the outside edge of the tread pointing front, and on the left side of the car the outside edge of the tread pointing rear. In other words, it's exactly like trying to put a left shoe on your right foot and right shoe on left foot, and then walk a strait line. If you decide to criss cross the tires, the two which are crossed could be de-mounted and turned inside out so that the tread runs the same direction as before. I believe the only U.S. car which requires this is the GM Corvette! Believe me, I have had plenty of trouble with the Firestones on my 99 Buick Regal and have been Battling GM on the problem also. The problem started when I had picked up a staple in the left front tire with about 35,000 on the car. The tire was plugged by my Buick dealer when I got the car inspected and instead of leaking 2 pounds per week, leaked 9 pounds per week. I didnt feel it was safe so moved it from the LF to the RR and put the RR on the LF. After this the car became very noisy and pulled to the right. After a few thousand miles I decided to replace all four with Goodyear Integretys. The Local goodyear dealer Jacked up the right side and demounted the two on right side., and replaced those two. He then jacked up the left side and replaced the two on the left side. I went home and put the car in the garage and did not use it for 6 days till my wife needed to use the car. The right front looked low so I checked it and it was down 9 lbs in the six days since goodyear put on the new tires.
I immediately drove down to the the Goodyear dealer. Incidently, he had replaced all four valves the week before. He put the RF wheel in water and there was a slow bubble coming up from the center of the aluminum rim. He marked it with a yellow crayon or chalk and put it back on the Car. I was madder than H and took the car immediately to my Buick Dealer (With 39,000 miles) on the odometer. They checked and the chalk apparently covered the hole in the rim. They scrubbed the wheel and did everything possible and still no leak. Now that was back in January and no leak since. I am sure you will find this story hard to believe but I have all the evidence documented just in case I have trouble with GM regarding warranty in the future, as they claimed a new aluminmum wheel would be several Hundred bucks.

best regards,

Don good
 
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