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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DanMan32 said:
I'm going to complain to Toyota. I never got my laser smart key. I only got the plain smart key without laser.

Or is that just a 2006 thing? :wink:
Hahahaha,

Good catch :)

I missed that, although I was more impressed with the rather positive tone of the series (as opposed to some other articles noted before in CR and other publications).
 

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"The hybrids have been profitable since very early on," said Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A. spokesman Wade Hoyt. "We're not losing money on it. It's not a charity operation. We see the market as expanding."

Can anyone get Wade's phone number and give it to Hyperion so they can discuss this and get back to us?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hyperion said:
It got what it deserved. It was a silly statement. What was the question asked Wade and who asked it? (consumer reports?)
Yeah, 'cuz why would anyone actually READ the 2 links before responding :twisted:
 

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No, the info in the links has all been posted defore except I have never seen Wades name before and he just made a statement. I would have loved to have heard the text and what had brought up the statement. Someone else must have brought up a question of why Toyota was not satisfying "the demand." You've been able to walk in and purchase a Highlander hybrid for a year now with several choices. That may be because of the $9,000 premium price over a standard however.
Now there well may be a reason for the incentives as most of the Toyota dealers in my area are advertising the Prius "now in stock."
I have heard of none asking more than MSRP.
 

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Wade is a "spokesman??? for Toyota. When I take my car in for the recall Monday I'll again ask the manager of my Toyota dealer if he has ever received an answer yet to the same question he and I have been both asking for two years. Why not an increase in the supply?
I'm still convinced my explanation is the only logical one and you've been hearing it for two years yourself from my posts.
I still believe your explanation of a shortage of building parts just won't "wash" with me from a company the size of Toyota after almost three years of limited production.
 

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These numbers are cannibalized, with additional arithmetic, from mrv's post on another forum:

Total Toyota/Lexus hybrid units:
mon / yr / cYTD / monthly sales / avg. daily sales
Jun 06 85,510 / 18,090 / 603
May 06 67,420 / 17,190 / 555
Apr 06 50,230 / 14,476 / 483
Mar 06 35,754 / 13,379 / 432
Feb 06 22,375 / 10,981 / 392
Jan 06 11,394 / 11,394 / 368

Now, hyperion, you'll notice an interesting trend in the numbers. Every month this year has had a higher average daily sales than the previous month. May and June were both all-time highs for total Toyota hybrid sales. Based on the daily average, Toyota hybrid sales were up 64 percent from January to June.

You may be tempted to reply that 64 percent in six months isn't enough, and that Toyota should be producing more hybrids right now, and that if GM had bothered to get its act together enough to invest in hybrid technology a decade ago - which, btw, it didn't - that it wouldn't have this problem.

Well, you're welcome to any opinion you wish to hold. I'd just like to point out two more things:

1. The current Prius is now essentially a three-year-old design, with a major remodel on the horizon. Does it make sense to invest in ramping up production now, when they're going to have to re-tool in a year? Especially if, as is rumored, the current production bottleneck - the battery pack - is going to be radically different in the next model Prius?

2. When the '04 Prius was first announced, Toyota said they hoped to sell 36,000 a year in the U.S. - and every automotive journalist who bothered to mention it said that it was optimistic. Toyota is already tripling that number.

So the true answer to your question about production goes back several years: In 2002, or whenever Toyota was re-tooling factories to produce the '04 Prius by fall of 2003, they seriously underestimated demand - as did everyone else in the industry. They've been struggling to catch up ever since, but they've also been careful not to overshoot and build more hybrids than the market will bear. They could have said, "get me a million battery packs, and I don't care what it costs." Instead, they've used the Prius' cachet - and part of that cachet is scarcity - to explore other niches in the SUV, luxury, and now, full-sized sedan markets.

Toyota has new factories coming on line for hybrid production. If in two years there hasn't been a significant increase in Toyota hybrid sales, then I'll gladly eat crow. (Mmmm ... crow!) Until then, your argument seems to be anything but logical.
 

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You have stated the facts but the same articles indicated that Toyota was taking a bath of about a two to three thousand loss on the new generation. That was one of the reasons I purchased my 04. That and a curiousty about hybrids and the "passing" on them by the "REST" of the worlds manufacturers. I feel I now know why they were passed on. The complexity and cost.
Aside of the Prius, there is NO other hybrid being made to retail for $20,000. Goes to cost and a limited production. As for that "not cranking up" production, in the same time frame Toyota has introduced four new models (non hybrid) that you have been able to purchase off the floor in the past year. Still haven't met the demand for Prius even though it was made known last year that there would be a $3,000 tax incentive and thus a greater demand.
I'm sorry, but my only conclusion is that the Prius is out there as the biggest bargain of the year still, and is being used as a tool to promote hybrid cars. I'll rethink my conclusions when I see an $18,000 Scion or Corolla hybrid.
At least I now know why Chrysler, Mercedes, VW, GM and Ford have no plans for a hybrid fleet. If the price of gas continues to escalate, I expect the rest of the world will come up with something and I would hope the profit returns to the American economy which at the present time is in my opinion much more important than "global warming."
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Just a little clarification on the hybrid components - GM actually helped fund the development of the NiMh battery - with a 60% investment in the company now called Texaco Ovonics. They hold the patent on the battery, now successfully defended in court. Unfortunatly, shortsighted GM sold their interest when they mismanaged they way toward bankruptcy. Now they are courting Nissan/Renault (after all other potential sutors backed off after seeing their debt)!

Didn't GM use the NiMh battery in their electric car?
 

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hyperion said:
If the price of gas continues to escalate, I expect the rest of the world will come up with something and I would hope the profit returns to the American economy which at the present time is in my opinion much more important than "global warming."
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You're implying that global warming and the American economy are completely disconnected. As the coming decades are going to make increasingly clear, they are inextricably linked - and I predict that it will eventually be understood that mitigating global warming will do more to help our economy than almost anything else we can do.
 
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