Timing belt or chain - Page 2 - Toyota Prius Forum : Prius Online Toyota Forums
User Tag List

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2005, 12:33 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 4,878
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

Just keep in mind that 90,000 miles on a prius means anout 75,000 on the ICE.



hyperion is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2005, 03:21 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Eastern Washington State
Posts: 887
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

Multilink timing chains are very resilient. Single link timing chains can stretch and that leads to off timing and breakage. Single link chains can put in a very long service life, however it just isn't the best way to employ a timing chain. Most manufacturers avoid using single link timing chains, anymore.

Most manufacturers choose timing chains over belts because they can engineer them to last the useable life of the vehicle. Timing belts are a pain because they stretch rather quickly and require change intervals which are basically not all that realistic with regard to how people drive vehicles. And a timing belt replacement requires just about as much labor and tear down to access as a timing chain anyway.

Changing the timing chain on the Prius is going to be very nasty to do. There isn't much space in the engine compartment to start with, and that will probably mean dropping the drive train, at least on the passenger side, to get to the front cover to access the chain. And my guess, at 90,000 they will find a chain that is in basically perfect condition, no stretching, no significant wear, no nothing. So, money out the door for something that didn't need to be serviced.

I'm not one to throw chance to the wind and risk things; I believe in preventative maintenance, but anymore, there are some things which aren't maintainable, or do not need maintenance as you would expect.

It has been said:
Hybrid drivers come in 3 flavors, greenie, techie and cheapie. Pick any 2.
2005 Prius, Millenium Silver Metallic (color code 1C0) over gray, package 5 (AI)
jeromep is offline  
post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2005, 04:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 4,878
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

The Prius does use a single timing chain but it is fairly simple to change as are most timing chains by removing a link, fastening a new chain to that link and turning the engine until you have access to both ends. It can also be loosened so that either or both of the overhead camshafts can be removed. It is fairly small in length and will probably never cause a problem.



hyperion is offline  
 
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2005, 07:54 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Yokohama, Japan
Posts: 466
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperion
Just keep in mind that 90,000 miles on a prius means anout 75,000 on the ICE.
One of record shows the ICE running percent was only 34%, which means 90,000 miles distance will be 30,600 miles by ICE running.
http://eshy.s22.xrea.com/cgi-bin/c-boar ... 50715T.jpg
ken1784 is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2005, 08:54 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 344
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

the timing chain is important, but so are the parts that hold it in place! my husband lost his old Saturn to that problem.
galaxee is offline  
post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-21-2005, 10:48 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 4,878
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

Well I tried for Kens info and read an awful lot of Japanese. I would sure question the 34%. Mine seems to be running a lot more of the time than that but Toyota hides the engine run time very well.
That's a very low run time to keep those batteries up.



hyperion is offline  
post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 01:13 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default 2005 Prius, just had "driving belt" replaced

My 05 Prius has about 60k miles on it. The last time I took it for an oil change they told me it was going to need a new belt - I let it ride. Took it in today for it's next oil change & had the new "driving belt" installed. Not sure if this is the same as a timing belt or chain. $155. complete if anyone is wondering.
tarams9 is offline  
post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 10:55 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Default

I am about 95% sure that the Prius ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) uses a timing chain, not a timing belt; and it should last a couple of hundred thousand miles before needing replacement. Also, timing belt replacement on other Toyotas costs much more than $155.

For $155, it sounds like they probably replaced a serpentine belt. This belt drives all of the mechanical stuff under the hood that isn't driven by an electric motor. I just had this belt changed on our 2002 Prius for the first time, at 135,000 miles; and it cost $36.70 for the belt and $80 labor to install it.

Toyota recommends an initial inspection at 60K miles/72 months, and again every 15K miles/18 months thereafter; and it is often replaced at around 90,000 to 120,000 miles as a routine maintenance item, when the belt starts to show wear or damage.

If you live in an area that is very dusty or has extreme weather conditions, the belt may deteriorate at a faster rate. Damage and wear is easily checked by the owner and appears as cracks and/or missing chunks in the rubber.

60,000 miles sounds a little premature, but the belt might have shown some wear. I suspect the dealer just changed it a little early (and made a little extra profit). However, changing a serpentine belt early is kind of like changing your oil too soon. It doesn't hurt anything, doesn't cost a whole lot (in the big scheme of things), and you don't have to worry about it again for quite awhile.

Take a look at your repair invoice and see if it says "serpentine belt". If it doesn't, look up the part number on Google to see what kind of belt they changed, or search for it on Amazon.com.
Phoenix is offline  
post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 10:59 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Default

I think you are right that it was the Serpentie belt - & I was probably over charged too! But I appreciate the helpful response, thank you.
tarams9 is offline  
post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 07-27-2013, 11:16 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 884
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Default

Local prices and labor charges vary a lot between dealers and locations. Many have reported serpentine belt replacement costs of up to $180. So, $155 is not excessive.

Anytime you have repairs done, ask the service advisor or tech to save the defective parts for you. They don't mind doing this. They just seal them in a plastic bag and put them on the floor of your car. That way you can verify for yourself that the repair was necessary (assuming the failure is something that can be confirmed visually).

You can also ask to watch them perform the repairs. Most shops will tell you that this isn't allowed due to accident liability. However, if you insist, most will allow you to stand just outside the maintenance bay. Just being there will often keep a questionable mechanic from doing anything fishy. Also, you are immediately available if they want to show you something or have a question on whether you wish to have something repaired/replaced.

This practice also makes them think twice about replacing perfectly good parts, if there is some doubt as to the integrity of your dealer's service department. Also, saving old parts can sometimes come in handy. In a real pinch, some parts can be reused as a temporary spare. For example, a slightly worn belt in the trunk of your car might be really handy to replace one that fails in Mexican Water, Arizona, in the middle of nowhere.

For now, I'd just chalk this up to experience and enjoy not worrying about your serpentine belt failing for the next 90-120,000 miles.

Last edited by Phoenix; 07-27-2013 at 11:18 PM.
Phoenix is offline  
Reply

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



  Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ICE Cam, Driven By Chain Or Belt? Oldwolf Toyota Prius - Technical Chat 7 05-29-2007 10:01 PM
Timing belt - does the Prius have one GlacierBobby Toyota Prius General Discussion 11 01-21-2007 11:57 PM
Odometer math vs. timing AgentElrond Toyota Prius - Technical Chat 14 10-20-2004 07:47 PM
Key Chain! Knguyen Toyota Prius General Discussion 32 08-28-2004 05:18 PM
Valve Timing... Chain or Belt SiJ2000 Toyota Prius - Technical Chat 5 07-03-2004 10:44 AM

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome